Previous Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Does Not Increase Adverse Events After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

Chikara Ueki, Hiroaki Miyata, Noboru Motomura, Genichi Sakaguchi, Takehide Akimoto, Shinichi Takamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Adverse effects of previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on clinical outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of previous PCI on early outcomes after subsequent CABG by using data from the Japanese national database. Methods: This study analyzed data from 48,051 consecutive patients that were retrieved from the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database. These patients underwent primary, isolated, elective CABG between January 2008 and December 2013. Early mortality and morbidity rates in patients with previous PCI (n = 12,457, 25.9%) were compared with those in patients with no PCI (n = 35,594, 74.1%) by using multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score analysis. Results: Operative mortality rates (no PCI, 1.2%; previous PCI, 1.2%; P = 0.970) and morbidity rates (no PCI, 7.4%; previous PCI, 7.2%; p = 0.436) were similar between the two groups. In risk-adjusted multivariate logistic-regression analysis, previous PCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.00; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82 to 1.22; p = 0.995) and morbidity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.05; p = 0.391) were not significant risk factors of operative mortality. Inverse probability of treatment weighting using the propensity score confirmed these results. Conclusions: This study shows that a previous PCI procedure does not increase postoperative adverse events after subsequent CABG. In the setting of repeat coronary revascularization, the most appropriate method of revascularization should be selected by the heart team, without being affected by a history of a previous PCI procedure.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Coronary Artery Bypass
Propensity Score
Morbidity
Mortality
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Databases
Confidence Intervals
Japan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Previous Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Does Not Increase Adverse Events After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery. / Ueki, Chikara; Miyata, Hiroaki; Motomura, Noboru; Sakaguchi, Genichi; Akimoto, Takehide; Takamoto, Shinichi.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ueki, Chikara ; Miyata, Hiroaki ; Motomura, Noboru ; Sakaguchi, Genichi ; Akimoto, Takehide ; Takamoto, Shinichi. / Previous Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Does Not Increase Adverse Events After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2016.
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abstract = "Background: Adverse effects of previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on clinical outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of previous PCI on early outcomes after subsequent CABG by using data from the Japanese national database. Methods: This study analyzed data from 48,051 consecutive patients that were retrieved from the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database. These patients underwent primary, isolated, elective CABG between January 2008 and December 2013. Early mortality and morbidity rates in patients with previous PCI (n = 12,457, 25.9{\%}) were compared with those in patients with no PCI (n = 35,594, 74.1{\%}) by using multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score analysis. Results: Operative mortality rates (no PCI, 1.2{\%}; previous PCI, 1.2{\%}; P = 0.970) and morbidity rates (no PCI, 7.4{\%}; previous PCI, 7.2{\%}; p = 0.436) were similar between the two groups. In risk-adjusted multivariate logistic-regression analysis, previous PCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.00; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.82 to 1.22; p = 0.995) and morbidity (OR, 0.97; 95{\%} CI, 0.89 to 1.05; p = 0.391) were not significant risk factors of operative mortality. Inverse probability of treatment weighting using the propensity score confirmed these results. Conclusions: This study shows that a previous PCI procedure does not increase postoperative adverse events after subsequent CABG. In the setting of repeat coronary revascularization, the most appropriate method of revascularization should be selected by the heart team, without being affected by a history of a previous PCI procedure.",
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AU - Akimoto, Takehide

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N2 - Background: Adverse effects of previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on clinical outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of previous PCI on early outcomes after subsequent CABG by using data from the Japanese national database. Methods: This study analyzed data from 48,051 consecutive patients that were retrieved from the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database. These patients underwent primary, isolated, elective CABG between January 2008 and December 2013. Early mortality and morbidity rates in patients with previous PCI (n = 12,457, 25.9%) were compared with those in patients with no PCI (n = 35,594, 74.1%) by using multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score analysis. Results: Operative mortality rates (no PCI, 1.2%; previous PCI, 1.2%; P = 0.970) and morbidity rates (no PCI, 7.4%; previous PCI, 7.2%; p = 0.436) were similar between the two groups. In risk-adjusted multivariate logistic-regression analysis, previous PCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.00; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82 to 1.22; p = 0.995) and morbidity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.05; p = 0.391) were not significant risk factors of operative mortality. Inverse probability of treatment weighting using the propensity score confirmed these results. Conclusions: This study shows that a previous PCI procedure does not increase postoperative adverse events after subsequent CABG. In the setting of repeat coronary revascularization, the most appropriate method of revascularization should be selected by the heart team, without being affected by a history of a previous PCI procedure.

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