Prognostic significance of preoperative plasma D-dimer level in patients with surgically resected clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer: A retrospective cohort study

Kaoru Kaseda, Keisuke Asakura, Akio Kazama, Yukihiko Ozawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Plasma D-dimer level, a marker of hypercoagulation, has been reported to be associated with survival in several types of cancers. The present study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of preoperative D-dimer levels in patients with surgically resected clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Participants comprised 237 patients with surgically resected clinical stage I NSCLC. In addition to factors such as age, sex, and smoking status, the association between preoperative D-dimer level and survival was explored. Results: Patients were divided into two groups according to D-dimer level: Group A, ≤ 1.0 μg/ml (n = 170); and Group B, > 1.0 μg/ml (n = 67). The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 81.6% for Group A and 66.6% for Group B (p < 0.001). The 5-year overall survival rate was 93.6% for Group A and 84.7% for Group B (p = 0.002). Multivariate survival analysis identified D-dimer level as an independent prognostic factor, along with age, maximum standardized uptake value of the primary tumor, and pathological stage. Conclusions: Preoperative D-dimer level is an independent prognostic factor in patients with surgically resected clinical stage I NSCLC.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Nov 28
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • D-dimer
  • Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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