Public awareness, knowledge of availability, and readiness for cancer palliative care services

A population-based survey across four regions in Japan

Kei Hirai, Tadashi Kudo, Miki Akiyama, Motohiro Matoba, Mariko Shiozaki, Teruko Yamaki, Akemi Yamagishi, Mitsunori Miyashita, Tatsuya Morita, Kenji Eguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This study explores the distribution of public awareness, knowledge of availability, and readiness for palliative care services, and the perceived reliability of information resources as part of a nationwide palliative care implementation intervention in Japan (Outreach Palliative Care Trial of Integrated Regional Model [OPTIM]). Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire survey was conducted, and 3984 responses were used in the final analysis. Results: A total of 63.1% of respondents admitted having no knowledge about palliative care, while 0.5% of respondents were using palliative care services. Respondents who knew about palliative care services, yet did not know about their availability were 18.6% of all respondents. Respondents who had cancer-related experiences were more likely to be aware of palliative care compared to the general population and availability of palliative care services. Only awareness of palliative care was significantly associated with two typical images, while cancer-related experiences were not. Conclusion: Findings show that the public awareness of palliative care services and their availability is insufficient, and cancer-related experiences affect awareness of cancer palliative care but not directly related to typical images for palliative care such as care for patients close to death.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)918-922
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Palliative Medicine
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Aug 1

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Palliative Care
Japan
Population
Neoplasms
Surveys and Questionnaires
Patient Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Nursing(all)

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Public awareness, knowledge of availability, and readiness for cancer palliative care services : A population-based survey across four regions in Japan. / Hirai, Kei; Kudo, Tadashi; Akiyama, Miki; Matoba, Motohiro; Shiozaki, Mariko; Yamaki, Teruko; Yamagishi, Akemi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Eguchi, Kenji.

In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 8, 01.08.2011, p. 918-922.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirai, Kei ; Kudo, Tadashi ; Akiyama, Miki ; Matoba, Motohiro ; Shiozaki, Mariko ; Yamaki, Teruko ; Yamagishi, Akemi ; Miyashita, Mitsunori ; Morita, Tatsuya ; Eguchi, Kenji. / Public awareness, knowledge of availability, and readiness for cancer palliative care services : A population-based survey across four regions in Japan. In: Journal of Palliative Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 14, No. 8. pp. 918-922.
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