Pyrrolidinium fullerene induces apoptosis by activation of procaspase-9 via suppression of Akt in primary effusion lymphoma

Tadashi Watanabe, Shigeo Nakamura, Toshiya Ono, Sadaharu Ui, Syota Yagi, Hiroki Kagawa, Hisami Watanabe, Tomoyuki Ohe, Tadahiko Mashino, Masahiro Fujimuro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a subtype of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in immunosuppressed patients. In general, PEL cells are derived from post-germinal center B-cells and are infected with KSHV. To evaluate potential novel anti-tumor compounds against KSHV-associated PEL, seven water-soluble fullerene derivatives were evaluated as potential drug candidates for the treatment of PEL. Herein, we discovered a pyrrolidinium fullerene derivative, 1,1,1′,1′-tetramethyl [60]fullerenodipyrrolidinium diiodide, which induced apoptosis of PEL cells via a novel mechanism, the caspase-9 activation by suppressing the caspase-9 phosphorylation, causing caspase-9 inactivation. Pyrrolidinium fullerene treatment reduced significantly the viability of PEL cells compared with KSHV-uninfected lymphoma cells, and induced the apoptosis of PEL cells by activating caspase-9 via procaspase-9 cleavage. Pyrrolidinium fullerene additionally reduced the Ser473 phosphorylation of Akt and Ser196 of procaspase-9. Ser473-phosphorylated Akt (i.e., activated Akt) phosphorylates Ser196 in procaspase-9, causing inactivation of procaspase-9. We also demonstrated that Akt inhibitors suppressed the proliferation of PEL cells compared with KSHV-uninfected cells. Our data therefore suggest that Akt activation is essential for cell survival in PEL and a pyrrolidinium fullerene derivative induced apoptosis by activating caspase-9 via suppression of Akt in PEL cells. In addition, we evaluated whether pyrrolidinium fullerene in combination with the HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin; GA) or valproate, potentiated the cytotoxic effects on PEL cells. Compared to treatment with pyrrolidinium fullerene alone, the addition of low-concentration GA or valproate enhanced the cytotoxic activity of pyrrolidinium fullerene. These results indicate that pyrrolidinium fullerene could be used as a novel therapy for the treatment of PEL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-100
Number of pages8
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume451
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Aug 15

Fingerprint

Primary Effusion Lymphoma
Fullerenes
Caspase 9
Chemical activation
Apoptosis
Human Herpesvirus 8
Phosphorylation
Cells
Valproic Acid
Derivatives
Germinal Center
Tumors
B-Cell Lymphoma
Therapeutics
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Keywords

  • Akt
  • Apoptosis
  • Caspase-9
  • Fullerene
  • KSHV
  • PEL

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pyrrolidinium fullerene induces apoptosis by activation of procaspase-9 via suppression of Akt in primary effusion lymphoma. / Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Shigeo; Ono, Toshiya; Ui, Sadaharu; Yagi, Syota; Kagawa, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hisami; Ohe, Tomoyuki; Mashino, Tadahiko; Fujimuro, Masahiro.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 451, No. 1, 15.08.2014, p. 93-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watanabe, Tadashi ; Nakamura, Shigeo ; Ono, Toshiya ; Ui, Sadaharu ; Yagi, Syota ; Kagawa, Hiroki ; Watanabe, Hisami ; Ohe, Tomoyuki ; Mashino, Tadahiko ; Fujimuro, Masahiro. / Pyrrolidinium fullerene induces apoptosis by activation of procaspase-9 via suppression of Akt in primary effusion lymphoma. In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 2014 ; Vol. 451, No. 1. pp. 93-100.
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