Quality of life and the prevalence of urinary incontinence after surgical treatment for gynecologic cancer: A questionnaire survey

Noriko Nakayama, Tetsuya Tsuji, Makoto Aoyama, Takafumi Fujino, Meigen Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Although there have been a number of reports on urinary voiding symptoms associated with surgical interventions for gynecologic cancer and post-voiding symptoms, there have been few reports on urinary storage symptoms such as urinary incontinence (UI) and overactive bladder (OAB). The purpose of this study was to examine the rates and impact on quality of life (QOL) of urinary storage symptoms after gynecologic cancer surgery. Methods: A questionnaire survey, including Japanese-language versions of the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS), and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7 (IIQ-7), was distributed to gynecologic cancer patients who underwent hysterectomy between 2008 and 2013. Results: Of the 145 patients analyzed, 49 (33.8%) had UI pre-surgery, and 76 (52.4%) had UI post-surgery, including 34 (35.4%) first-time UI patients, with a significant difference between pre- and post-surgery. Of the 49 subjects with UI pre-surgery, 43 (87.7%) had stress incontinence, while of the 76 patients with UI post-surgery, 44 (57.1%) had stress incontinence, and 24 (31.2%) had mixed incontinence. Seven (4.8%) subjects had OAB pre-surgery, whereas 19 (13.1%) had OAB symptoms post-surgery (including 15 first-time OAB patients), with a significant difference between pre- and post-surgery. IIQ-7 scores were markedly higher for patients with mixed incontinence post-surgery than for those with stress incontinence, indicating a lower QOL. Logistic regression analysis identified the number of Cesarean sections and days of urinary bladder catheterization as risk factors for postoperative UI. Conclusions: UI and OAB rates were higher after gynecologic cancer surgery than in the general female population. The mixed incontinence rate was markedly higher post-surgery; QOL was low for such patients due to the combination of urge and stress incontinence. Multiple Cesarean sections and urinary bladder catheterization post-surgery were risk factors for post-surgical UI.

Original languageEnglish
Article number148
JournalBMC Women's Health
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jul 17

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Gynecologic cancer
  • Quality of life
  • Urinary incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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