Quantum-dot single-photon source on a CMOS silicon photonic chip integrated using transfer printing

Ryota Katsumi, Yasutomo Ota, Alto Osada, Takuto Yamaguchi, Takeyoshi Tajiri, Masahiro Kakuda, Satoshi Iwamoto, Hidefumi Akiyama, Yasuhiko Arakawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Silicon photonics is a powerful platform for implementing large-scale photonic integrated circuits (PICs) because of its compatibility with mature complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Exploiting silicon-based PICs for quantum photonic information processing (or the so-called silicon quantum photonics) provides a promising pathway for large-scale quantum applications. For the development of scalable silicon quantum PICs, a major challenge is integrating on-silicon quantum light sources that deterministically emit single photons. In this regard, the use of epitaxial InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) is a very promising approach because of their capability of deterministic single-photon emission with high purity and indistinguishability. However, the required hybrid integration is inherently difficult and often lacks the compatibility with CMOS processes. Here, we demonstrate a QD single-photon source integrated on a glass-clad silicon photonic waveguide processed by a CMOS foundry. Hybrid integration is performed using transfer printing, which enables us to integrate heterogeneous optical components in a simple pick-and-place manner and thus assemble them after the entire CMOS process is completed. We observe single-photon emission from the integrated QD and its efficient coupling into the silicon waveguide. Our transfer-printing-based approach is fully compatible with CMOS back-end processes and thus will open the possibility for realizing large-scale quantum PICs that leverage CMOS technology.

Original languageEnglish
Article number036105
JournalAPL Photonics
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Mar 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Quantum-dot single-photon source on a CMOS silicon photonic chip integrated using transfer printing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this