Racism on the Web: Its rhetoric and marketing

Lynn Thiesmeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Poster (1989) and Schiller (1996) point out that electronic communications have the power to change social and political relationships. The 'new' discourse of the Internet has political uses in spreading neo-Nazi ideology and action. I look at two kinds of online neo-Nazi discourse: hate speech itself, including text, music, online radio broadcasts, and images that exhort users to act against target groups; and persuasive rhetoric that does not directly enunciate but ultimately promotes or justifies violence. The online location of these discourses poses urgent questions. Does information technology make the re-emergence of prejudicial messages and attitudes swifter and more likely? Does the Internet's wide range of distribution make for more followers and finally more persuasion?

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-125
Number of pages9
JournalEthics and Information Technology
Volume1
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

racism
Marketing
rhetoric
marketing
Internet
discourse
Information technology
hate
target group
poster
persuasion
follower
broadcast
Communication
radio
communications
music
ideology
information technology
electronics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Racism on the Web : Its rhetoric and marketing. / Thiesmeyer, Lynn.

In: Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1999, p. 117-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thiesmeyer, L 1999, 'Racism on the Web: Its rhetoric and marketing', Ethics and Information Technology, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 117-125.
Thiesmeyer, Lynn. / Racism on the Web : Its rhetoric and marketing. In: Ethics and Information Technology. 1999 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 117-125.
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