Randomised controlled trial on the effect of internet-delivered computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy on patients with insomnia who remain symptomatic following hypnotics: A study protocol

Daisuke Sato, Naoki Yoshinaga, Eiichi Nagai, Hideki Hanaoka, Yasunori Sato, Eiji Shimizu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Insomnia has severe consequences for health. Primary care physicians in Japan commonly provide hypnotics, which is far from optimal. The recommended treatment for insomnia is cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). Access to trained therapists, however, is limited. Rather than face-to-face CBT, several researchers have studied internet-delivered computerised CBT (ICBT). This paper describes the study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate effectiveness and feasibility of our newly developed five-step ICBT as an adjunct to usual care (UC) compared with UC alone for patients with insomnia who remain symptomatic following hypnotics. Methods and analysis This proposed exploratory RCT comprises two parallel groups (ICBT+UC and UC alone) consisting of 15 participants each (n=30) diagnosed with insomnia who remain symptomatic after pharmacotherapy. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness of six intervention weeks. The primary outcome of insomnia severity will be the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at week 6. Secondary outcomes include sleep onset latency, total sleep time, sleep efficiency extracted from PSQI, current feeling of refreshment and perceived soundness of sleep measured using visual analogue scale, number of awakenings, anxiety by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, depression by Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and quality of life by Euro Qol-5D. All measures will be assessed at weeks 0 (baseline), 6 (postintervention) and 12 (follow-up), and intention-to-treat analysis will be applied. The statistical analysis plan has been developed considering design of field materials. Ethics and dissemination This study will be conducted at the academic outpatient clinic of Chiba University Hospital, Japan. Ethics approval was granted by the Institutional Review Board of Chiba University Hospital. All participants will be required to provide written informed consent. The trial will be implemented and reported in accordance with Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials recommendations. Trial registration number UMIN000021509; Pre-results.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere018220
JournalBMJ open
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Cognitive Therapy
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Internet
Sleep
Randomized Controlled Trials
Depression
Ethics
Japan
Anxiety
Intention to Treat Analysis
Research Ethics Committees
Primary Care Physicians
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Informed Consent
Visual Analog Scale
Epidemiologic Studies
Patient Care
Emotions
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • cognitive behavioral therapy
  • insomnia
  • internet
  • randomized controlled Trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Randomised controlled trial on the effect of internet-delivered computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy on patients with insomnia who remain symptomatic following hypnotics : A study protocol. / Sato, Daisuke; Yoshinaga, Naoki; Nagai, Eiichi; Hanaoka, Hideki; Sato, Yasunori; Shimizu, Eiji.

In: BMJ open, Vol. 8, No. 1, e018220, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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