Real-time imaging of mechanically injured femoral artery in mice reveals a biphasic pattern of leukocyte accumulation

Mizuko Osaka, Sumihiko Hagita, Mihoko Haraguchi, Mayumi Kajimura, Makoto Suematsu, Masayuki Yoshida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wire injury of an artery has been recognized as a standard model of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis; however, the mechanism of leukocyte recruitment has not been studied in this model. In this study, we documented the recruitment of leukocytes to the murine femoral artery after a wire injury. A transluminal mechanical injury was generated by insertion of a wire into the femoral artery of male C57BL/6J mice. The mice were anesthetized and ventilated after tracheotomy and protected from hypothermia by a warming lamp. Body temperature and blood pH did not significantly change during the experiment. The interaction between rhodamine 6G-labeled leukocytes and the injured femoral artery was monitored using an epifluorescent microscope, and the images were evaluated using a computer-assisted image analysis program. In the absence of injury, virtually no leukocyte adhesion was observed. In contrast, the number of adherent leukocytes increased 4 and 24 h after injury and declined 72 h after injury. The rolling flux of leukocytes increased 4 h after injury and remained high up to 7 days, but it was faster 72 h after injury. We identified another peak of leukocyte adhesion 7 days after injury. Injection of anti-P-selectin antibody significantly reduced leukocyte adhesion at the early and later phases. In conclusion, we have established a novel experimental system for direct observation of leukocyte recruitment to the injured femoral artery. Our system revealed a previously undetected, unique profile of leukocyte recruitment during vascular injury.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume292
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Apr

Fingerprint

Femoral Artery
Leukocytes
Wounds and Injuries
Leukocyte Rolling
Tracheotomy
P-Selectin
Computer-Assisted Image Processing
Vascular System Injuries
Hypothermia
Body Temperature
Leukocyte Count
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Blood Vessels
Atherosclerosis
Arteries
Observation
Inflammation
Injections
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Inflammation
  • Intravital microscopy
  • Leukocyte adhesion
  • Vascular injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Real-time imaging of mechanically injured femoral artery in mice reveals a biphasic pattern of leukocyte accumulation. / Osaka, Mizuko; Hagita, Sumihiko; Haraguchi, Mihoko; Kajimura, Mayumi; Suematsu, Makoto; Yoshida, Masayuki.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 292, No. 4, 04.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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