Real-time scheduling with task splitting on multiprocessors

Shinpei Kato, Nobuyuki Yamasaki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents a real-time scheduling algorithm with high schedulability and few preemptions for multiprocessor systems. The algorithm is based on an unorthodox method called portioned scheduling that assigns each task to a particular processor like partitioned scheduling but can split a task into two processors if there is not enough capacity remaining on a processor. We describe an algorithm for assigning tasks to processors as well as an algorithm for scheduling the assigned tasks on per-processor. The schedulability analysis provides a formula to calculate the upper bound of the schedulable per-processor utilization for the algorithm. We then prove that the least upper bound of the whole system utilization is 50%. In addition, we propose heuristic procedures to improve schedulability. The simulation results show that the algorithm can often successfully schedule a task set with system utilization much higher than 50%, though the least upper bound is 50%. We also show that the algorithm achieves higher schedulability with fewer preemptions compared to the existiting algorithms.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 13th IEEE International Conference on Embedded and Real-Time Computing Systems and Applications, RTCSA 2007
Pages441-450
Number of pages10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Event4296821 - Daegu, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 2007 Aug 212007 Aug 24

Publication series

NameProceedings - 13th IEEE International Conference on Embedded and Real-Time Computing Systems and Applications, RTCSA 2007

Other

Other4296821
CountryKorea, Republic of
CityDaegu
Period07/8/2107/8/24

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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