Reconstitution of Schwannian stroma in neuroblastomas using human bone marrow stromal cells

Wenlin Du, Nobumichi Hozumi, Michiie Sakamoto, Jun Ichi Hata, Taketo Yamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Schwannian stroma in neuroblastomas is related to patient prognosis. There is debate surrounding the origin of Schwannian stroma in neuroblastomas: one theory is that the Schwann cells are derived from neoplastic cells, and the other is that they arise from normal cells surrounding the neuroblastoma. We examined whether human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) or human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) could differentiate into Schwann cells in neuroblastomas. hBMSCs or hMSCs along with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were injected into xenotransplanted neuroblastomas in nonobese diabetic mice with severe combined immunodeficiency and the resulting tumors were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. HBMSCs and hMSCs were co-cultured with neuroblastoma cells, and the induction of Schwann cell-specific molecules, S100beta and Egr-2, was monitored. S100beta-positive Schwannian stroma was observed only in neuroblastomas containing either hBMSCs or hMSCs, but not in neuroblastomas lacking these cells. Double staining with anti-S100 and anti-EGFP antibodies showed that S100-positive cells in neuroblastomas were also EGFP-positive. By contrast, hBMSCs did not develop into Schwann cells in Ewing's sarcoma, demonstrating that differentiation of transplanted hBMSCs or hMSCs into Schwann cells occurs specifically in neuroblastomas. Both S100beta and Egr-2 were expressed in hBMSCs or hMSCs co-cultured with neuroblastoma cells. HBMSCs or hMSCs may contribute to the formation of human tumor stroma. The Schwannian stroma of neuroblastomas appears to be derived from nonneoplastic stromal cells rather than neuroblastoma cells, further clarifying its developmental origins.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1153-1164
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume173
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct

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Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Neuroblastoma
Schwann Cells
Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
Inbred NOD Mouse
Ewing's Sarcoma
Stromal Cells
Neoplasms
Immunohistochemistry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Reconstitution of Schwannian stroma in neuroblastomas using human bone marrow stromal cells. / Du, Wenlin; Hozumi, Nobumichi; Sakamoto, Michiie; Hata, Jun Ichi; Yamada, Taketo.

In: American Journal of Pathology, Vol. 173, No. 4, 10.2008, p. 1153-1164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Du, Wenlin ; Hozumi, Nobumichi ; Sakamoto, Michiie ; Hata, Jun Ichi ; Yamada, Taketo. / Reconstitution of Schwannian stroma in neuroblastomas using human bone marrow stromal cells. In: American Journal of Pathology. 2008 ; Vol. 173, No. 4. pp. 1153-1164.
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