Regulation of reactive oxygen species in stem cells and cancer stem cells

Chiharu I. Kobayashi, Toshio Suda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

142 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and their multi-potent differentiation capacity. As such, stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the life of a multicellular organism. Aerobic metabolism, while enabling efficient energy production, also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), which damage cellular components. Until recently, the focus in stem cell biology has been on the adverse effects of ROS, particularly the damaging effects of ROS accumulation on tissue aging and the development of cancer, and various anti-oxidative and anti-stress mechanisms of stem cells have been characterized. However, it has become increasingly clear that, in some cases, redox status plays an important role in stem cell maintenance, i.e., regulation of the cell cycle. An active area of current research is redox regulation in various cancer stem cells, the malignant counterparts of normal stem cells that are viewed as good targets of cancer therapy. In contrast to cancer cells, in which ROS levels are increased, some cancer stem cells maintain low ROS levels, exhibiting redox patterns that are similar to the corresponding normal stem cell. To fully elucidate the mechanisms involved in stem cell maintenance and to effectively target cancer stem cells, it is essential to understand ROS regulatory mechanisms in these different cell types. Here, the mechanisms of redox regulation in normal stem cells, cancer cells, and cancer stem cells are reviewed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)421-430
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cellular Physiology
Volume227
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan

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Neoplastic Stem Cells
Stem cells
Reactive Oxygen Species
Stem Cells
Oxidation-Reduction
Maintenance
Cells
Neoplasms
Tissue homeostasis
Cell Biology
Cytology
Cell Cycle
Oxidative Stress
Homeostasis
Metabolism
Research
Aging of materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Regulation of reactive oxygen species in stem cells and cancer stem cells. / Kobayashi, Chiharu I.; Suda, Toshio.

In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, Vol. 227, No. 2, 01.2012, p. 421-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kobayashi, Chiharu I. ; Suda, Toshio. / Regulation of reactive oxygen species in stem cells and cancer stem cells. In: Journal of Cellular Physiology. 2012 ; Vol. 227, No. 2. pp. 421-430.
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