Repeated exposure rather than the total volume of transfused components may influence the incidence of allergic transfusion reactions

Hidefumi Kato, Takayuki Nakayama, Motoaki Uruma, Yoshiki Okuyama, Makoto Handa, Yoshiaki Tomiyama, Shigetaka Shimodaira, Shigeru Takamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND The plasma fraction of blood components has an essential role in the etiology of allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs). The difference of incidences of ATRs between fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and platelet concentrates (PCs), in which plasma is the main component, is not clearly understood. This study compares the frequency of ATRs to FFP versus PCs on both first and subsequent (nonfirst) transfusions and considers the factors influencing the risk of ATRs. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Five hospitals agreed to systematically collect and share 2 years of data (January 2010 through December 2011). This was a retrospective observational analysis of data including the number of transfusion episodes and ATRs for FFP and PCs on first-transfusion patients (without transfusion history) and previously transfused patients. RESULTS The incidence of ATRs to PCs (2.51%) was significantly higher than to FFP (1.68%) on subsequent transfusions (p <0.001). On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the incidences of ATRs to FFP (2.67%) and PCs (2.82%) on first transfusions. This discrepancy was most pronounced among males: FFP versus PCs on first transfusions, 2.02% versus 2.60% (p = 0.30); and on subsequent transfusions, 1.58% versus 2.46% (p = 0.0007). Among females, FFP versus PCs on first transfusions was 3.59% versus 3.13% (p = 0.61) and on subsequent transfusions was 1.87% versus 2.61% (p = 0.029). CONCLUSION Repeated exposure rather than the total volume of transfused components may influence the incidence of ATRs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2576-2581
Number of pages6
JournalTransfusion
Volume55
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Nov 1

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Hypersensitivity
Blood Platelets
Incidence
Transfusion Reaction
History

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Kato, H., Nakayama, T., Uruma, M., Okuyama, Y., Handa, M., Tomiyama, Y., ... Takamoto, S. (2015). Repeated exposure rather than the total volume of transfused components may influence the incidence of allergic transfusion reactions. Transfusion, 55(11), 2576-2581. https://doi.org/10.1111/trf.13201

Repeated exposure rather than the total volume of transfused components may influence the incidence of allergic transfusion reactions. / Kato, Hidefumi; Nakayama, Takayuki; Uruma, Motoaki; Okuyama, Yoshiki; Handa, Makoto; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Takamoto, Shigeru.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 55, No. 11, 01.11.2015, p. 2576-2581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kato, H, Nakayama, T, Uruma, M, Okuyama, Y, Handa, M, Tomiyama, Y, Shimodaira, S & Takamoto, S 2015, 'Repeated exposure rather than the total volume of transfused components may influence the incidence of allergic transfusion reactions', Transfusion, vol. 55, no. 11, pp. 2576-2581. https://doi.org/10.1111/trf.13201
Kato, Hidefumi ; Nakayama, Takayuki ; Uruma, Motoaki ; Okuyama, Yoshiki ; Handa, Makoto ; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki ; Shimodaira, Shigetaka ; Takamoto, Shigeru. / Repeated exposure rather than the total volume of transfused components may influence the incidence of allergic transfusion reactions. In: Transfusion. 2015 ; Vol. 55, No. 11. pp. 2576-2581.
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AU - Kato, Hidefumi

AU - Nakayama, Takayuki

AU - Uruma, Motoaki

AU - Okuyama, Yoshiki

AU - Handa, Makoto

AU - Tomiyama, Yoshiaki

AU - Shimodaira, Shigetaka

AU - Takamoto, Shigeru

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N2 - BACKGROUND The plasma fraction of blood components has an essential role in the etiology of allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs). The difference of incidences of ATRs between fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and platelet concentrates (PCs), in which plasma is the main component, is not clearly understood. This study compares the frequency of ATRs to FFP versus PCs on both first and subsequent (nonfirst) transfusions and considers the factors influencing the risk of ATRs. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Five hospitals agreed to systematically collect and share 2 years of data (January 2010 through December 2011). This was a retrospective observational analysis of data including the number of transfusion episodes and ATRs for FFP and PCs on first-transfusion patients (without transfusion history) and previously transfused patients. RESULTS The incidence of ATRs to PCs (2.51%) was significantly higher than to FFP (1.68%) on subsequent transfusions (p <0.001). On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the incidences of ATRs to FFP (2.67%) and PCs (2.82%) on first transfusions. This discrepancy was most pronounced among males: FFP versus PCs on first transfusions, 2.02% versus 2.60% (p = 0.30); and on subsequent transfusions, 1.58% versus 2.46% (p = 0.0007). Among females, FFP versus PCs on first transfusions was 3.59% versus 3.13% (p = 0.61) and on subsequent transfusions was 1.87% versus 2.61% (p = 0.029). CONCLUSION Repeated exposure rather than the total volume of transfused components may influence the incidence of ATRs.

AB - BACKGROUND The plasma fraction of blood components has an essential role in the etiology of allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs). The difference of incidences of ATRs between fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and platelet concentrates (PCs), in which plasma is the main component, is not clearly understood. This study compares the frequency of ATRs to FFP versus PCs on both first and subsequent (nonfirst) transfusions and considers the factors influencing the risk of ATRs. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Five hospitals agreed to systematically collect and share 2 years of data (January 2010 through December 2011). This was a retrospective observational analysis of data including the number of transfusion episodes and ATRs for FFP and PCs on first-transfusion patients (without transfusion history) and previously transfused patients. RESULTS The incidence of ATRs to PCs (2.51%) was significantly higher than to FFP (1.68%) on subsequent transfusions (p <0.001). On the other hand, there were no significant differences in the incidences of ATRs to FFP (2.67%) and PCs (2.82%) on first transfusions. This discrepancy was most pronounced among males: FFP versus PCs on first transfusions, 2.02% versus 2.60% (p = 0.30); and on subsequent transfusions, 1.58% versus 2.46% (p = 0.0007). Among females, FFP versus PCs on first transfusions was 3.59% versus 3.13% (p = 0.61) and on subsequent transfusions was 1.87% versus 2.61% (p = 0.029). CONCLUSION Repeated exposure rather than the total volume of transfused components may influence the incidence of ATRs.

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