Reproduction and family building strategies in early modern Japan: Evidence from two northeastern farming villages

Noriko O. Tsuya, Satomi Kurosu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing data from the local population registers called "ninbetsu-aratame-cho," this study examines the patterns and covariates of reproduction and family building in two farming villages in northeastern Japan in 1716-1870. Marriages in these villages were very early and universal for both sexes, but reproduction within marriage was very low, due in part to curtailment of reproduction at relatively young ages, but also to long intervals between recorded births. Stopping and spacing of family building were achieved primarily by an extensive use of sex- and parity-specific infanticide, which enabled peasant couples to control the size and gender-sequence of their progeny. Women's positions within their household and in the village also influenced their family building processes. Peasant couples in these preindustrial Japanese farming villages were active planners of their reproductive life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-429
Number of pages17
JournalHistory of the Family
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Oct 29

Fingerprint

village
Japan
peasant
evidence
marriage
local population
Farming
Village
gender
Marriage
Peasants

Keywords

  • Early modern Japan
  • Event history analysis
  • Family building
  • Infanticide
  • Marriage
  • Reproduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Reproduction and family building strategies in early modern Japan : Evidence from two northeastern farming villages. / Tsuya, Noriko O.; Kurosu, Satomi.

In: History of the Family, Vol. 15, No. 4, 29.10.2010, p. 413-429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3a04e4740335400984b3bcf0e419b30f,
title = "Reproduction and family building strategies in early modern Japan: Evidence from two northeastern farming villages",
abstract = "Drawing data from the local population registers called {"}ninbetsu-aratame-cho,{"} this study examines the patterns and covariates of reproduction and family building in two farming villages in northeastern Japan in 1716-1870. Marriages in these villages were very early and universal for both sexes, but reproduction within marriage was very low, due in part to curtailment of reproduction at relatively young ages, but also to long intervals between recorded births. Stopping and spacing of family building were achieved primarily by an extensive use of sex- and parity-specific infanticide, which enabled peasant couples to control the size and gender-sequence of their progeny. Women's positions within their household and in the village also influenced their family building processes. Peasant couples in these preindustrial Japanese farming villages were active planners of their reproductive life.",
keywords = "Early modern Japan, Event history analysis, Family building, Infanticide, Marriage, Reproduction",
author = "Tsuya, {Noriko O.} and Satomi Kurosu",
year = "2010",
month = "10",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1016/j.hisfam.2010.05.004",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "413--429",
journal = "History of the Family",
issn = "1081-602X",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reproduction and family building strategies in early modern Japan

T2 - Evidence from two northeastern farming villages

AU - Tsuya, Noriko O.

AU - Kurosu, Satomi

PY - 2010/10/29

Y1 - 2010/10/29

N2 - Drawing data from the local population registers called "ninbetsu-aratame-cho," this study examines the patterns and covariates of reproduction and family building in two farming villages in northeastern Japan in 1716-1870. Marriages in these villages were very early and universal for both sexes, but reproduction within marriage was very low, due in part to curtailment of reproduction at relatively young ages, but also to long intervals between recorded births. Stopping and spacing of family building were achieved primarily by an extensive use of sex- and parity-specific infanticide, which enabled peasant couples to control the size and gender-sequence of their progeny. Women's positions within their household and in the village also influenced their family building processes. Peasant couples in these preindustrial Japanese farming villages were active planners of their reproductive life.

AB - Drawing data from the local population registers called "ninbetsu-aratame-cho," this study examines the patterns and covariates of reproduction and family building in two farming villages in northeastern Japan in 1716-1870. Marriages in these villages were very early and universal for both sexes, but reproduction within marriage was very low, due in part to curtailment of reproduction at relatively young ages, but also to long intervals between recorded births. Stopping and spacing of family building were achieved primarily by an extensive use of sex- and parity-specific infanticide, which enabled peasant couples to control the size and gender-sequence of their progeny. Women's positions within their household and in the village also influenced their family building processes. Peasant couples in these preindustrial Japanese farming villages were active planners of their reproductive life.

KW - Early modern Japan

KW - Event history analysis

KW - Family building

KW - Infanticide

KW - Marriage

KW - Reproduction

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649941630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78649941630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.hisfam.2010.05.004

DO - 10.1016/j.hisfam.2010.05.004

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:78649941630

VL - 15

SP - 413

EP - 429

JO - History of the Family

JF - History of the Family

SN - 1081-602X

IS - 4

ER -