Reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro

Li Qian, Emily C. Berry, Ji Dong Fu, Masaki Ieda, Deepak Srivastava

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cardiac fibroblasts can be reprogrammed to cardiomyocyte-like cells by the introduction of three transcription factors: Gata4, Mef2c and Tbx5 (collectively referred to here as GMT). Resident cardiac fibroblasts can be converted in vivo into induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) that closely resemble endogenous cardiomyocytes and electrically integrate with the host myocardium. In contrast, in vitro reprogramming yields many partially reprogrammed iCMs, with a few that reprogram fully into contracting myocytes (∼3 out of 10,000 GMT-transduced cells). iCMs can be observed as early as 3 d after viral infection, and they continue to mature over 2 months before beating is observed. Despite the success of multiple groups, the inefficiency of in vitro reprogramming has made it challenging for others. However, given the advantages of in vitro iCMs for performing mechanistic studies and, if refined, for testing drugs or small molecules for personalized medicine and modeling cardiac disease in a dish, it is important to standardize the protocol to improve reproducibility and enhance the technology further. Here we describe a detailed step-by-step protocol for in vitro cardiac reprogramming using retroviruses encoding GMT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1204-1215
Number of pages12
JournalNature Protocols
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jun

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Fibroblasts
Cardiac Myocytes
Medicine
Transcription Factors
Precision Medicine
Molecules
Testing
Virus Diseases
Retroviridae
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Muscle Cells
Heart Diseases
Myocardium
Technology
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Qian, L., Berry, E. C., Fu, J. D., Ieda, M., & Srivastava, D. (2013). Reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro. Nature Protocols, 8(6), 1204-1215. https://doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2013.067

Reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro. / Qian, Li; Berry, Emily C.; Fu, Ji Dong; Ieda, Masaki; Srivastava, Deepak.

In: Nature Protocols, Vol. 8, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 1204-1215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qian, L, Berry, EC, Fu, JD, Ieda, M & Srivastava, D 2013, 'Reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro', Nature Protocols, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 1204-1215. https://doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2013.067
Qian, Li ; Berry, Emily C. ; Fu, Ji Dong ; Ieda, Masaki ; Srivastava, Deepak. / Reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro. In: Nature Protocols. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 1204-1215.
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