Resilience and spirituality in patients with depression and their family members: A cross-sectional study

Chisa Ozawa, Takefumi Suzuki, Yuya Mizuno, Ryosuke Tarumi, Kazunari Yoshida, Kazuhito Fujii, Jinichi Hirano, Hideaki Tani, Ellen B. Rubinstein, Masaru Mimura, Hiroyuki Uchida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The degree and quality of resilience in patients with depression have never been investigated in the context of remission status, spirituality/religiosity, and family members' resilience levels, which was addressed in this study. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited Japanese outpatients with depressive disorder according to ICD-10 and cohabitant family members who were free from psychiatric diagnoses. Resilience was assessed using the 25-item Resilience Scale (RS). Other assessments included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being Scale (FACIT) and Kasen et al.'s (2012) scale for spirituality/religiosity; and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). Results One hundred outpatients with depression (mean ± SD age, 50.8 ± 14.5 years; 44 men; MADRS total score 9.8 ± 9.0) and 36 healthy family members (mean ± SD age, 56.5 ± 15.0 years; 18 men) were included. Symptom severity, attendance at religious/spiritual services, and self-esteem were significantly associated with RS scores in the patient group. RS total scores were significantly higher in remitted patients compared to non-remitted patients (mean ± SD, 112.3 ± 17.1 vs. 84.8 ± 27.7, p < 0.001). No correlation was found in RS total scores between patients and their family members (p = 0.265), regardless of patients' remission status. Conclusions Resilience may be influenced by individual characteristics rather than familial environment; furthermore, self-esteem or spirituality/religiosity may represent reinforcing elements. While caution is necessary in extrapolating these findings to other patient populations, our results suggest that resilience may be considered a state marker in depression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-59
Number of pages7
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume77
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Aug 1

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Spirituality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Self Concept
Outpatients
Spiritual Therapies
International Classification of Diseases
Depressive Disorder
Mental Disorders
Chronic Disease
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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Resilience and spirituality in patients with depression and their family members : A cross-sectional study. / Ozawa, Chisa; Suzuki, Takefumi; Mizuno, Yuya; Tarumi, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Kazunari; Fujii, Kazuhito; Hirano, Jinichi; Tani, Hideaki; Rubinstein, Ellen B.; Mimura, Masaru; Uchida, Hiroyuki.

In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 77, 01.08.2017, p. 53-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ozawa, Chisa ; Suzuki, Takefumi ; Mizuno, Yuya ; Tarumi, Ryosuke ; Yoshida, Kazunari ; Fujii, Kazuhito ; Hirano, Jinichi ; Tani, Hideaki ; Rubinstein, Ellen B. ; Mimura, Masaru ; Uchida, Hiroyuki. / Resilience and spirituality in patients with depression and their family members : A cross-sectional study. In: Comprehensive Psychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 77. pp. 53-59.
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abstract = "Objective The degree and quality of resilience in patients with depression have never been investigated in the context of remission status, spirituality/religiosity, and family members' resilience levels, which was addressed in this study. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited Japanese outpatients with depressive disorder according to ICD-10 and cohabitant family members who were free from psychiatric diagnoses. Resilience was assessed using the 25-item Resilience Scale (RS). Other assessments included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being Scale (FACIT) and Kasen et al.'s (2012) scale for spirituality/religiosity; and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). Results One hundred outpatients with depression (mean ± SD age, 50.8 ± 14.5 years; 44 men; MADRS total score 9.8 ± 9.0) and 36 healthy family members (mean ± SD age, 56.5 ± 15.0 years; 18 men) were included. Symptom severity, attendance at religious/spiritual services, and self-esteem were significantly associated with RS scores in the patient group. RS total scores were significantly higher in remitted patients compared to non-remitted patients (mean ± SD, 112.3 ± 17.1 vs. 84.8 ± 27.7, p < 0.001). No correlation was found in RS total scores between patients and their family members (p = 0.265), regardless of patients' remission status. Conclusions Resilience may be influenced by individual characteristics rather than familial environment; furthermore, self-esteem or spirituality/religiosity may represent reinforcing elements. While caution is necessary in extrapolating these findings to other patient populations, our results suggest that resilience may be considered a state marker in depression.",
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T2 - A cross-sectional study

AU - Ozawa, Chisa

AU - Suzuki, Takefumi

AU - Mizuno, Yuya

AU - Tarumi, Ryosuke

AU - Yoshida, Kazunari

AU - Fujii, Kazuhito

AU - Hirano, Jinichi

AU - Tani, Hideaki

AU - Rubinstein, Ellen B.

AU - Mimura, Masaru

AU - Uchida, Hiroyuki

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Objective The degree and quality of resilience in patients with depression have never been investigated in the context of remission status, spirituality/religiosity, and family members' resilience levels, which was addressed in this study. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited Japanese outpatients with depressive disorder according to ICD-10 and cohabitant family members who were free from psychiatric diagnoses. Resilience was assessed using the 25-item Resilience Scale (RS). Other assessments included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being Scale (FACIT) and Kasen et al.'s (2012) scale for spirituality/religiosity; and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). Results One hundred outpatients with depression (mean ± SD age, 50.8 ± 14.5 years; 44 men; MADRS total score 9.8 ± 9.0) and 36 healthy family members (mean ± SD age, 56.5 ± 15.0 years; 18 men) were included. Symptom severity, attendance at religious/spiritual services, and self-esteem were significantly associated with RS scores in the patient group. RS total scores were significantly higher in remitted patients compared to non-remitted patients (mean ± SD, 112.3 ± 17.1 vs. 84.8 ± 27.7, p < 0.001). No correlation was found in RS total scores between patients and their family members (p = 0.265), regardless of patients' remission status. Conclusions Resilience may be influenced by individual characteristics rather than familial environment; furthermore, self-esteem or spirituality/religiosity may represent reinforcing elements. While caution is necessary in extrapolating these findings to other patient populations, our results suggest that resilience may be considered a state marker in depression.

AB - Objective The degree and quality of resilience in patients with depression have never been investigated in the context of remission status, spirituality/religiosity, and family members' resilience levels, which was addressed in this study. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited Japanese outpatients with depressive disorder according to ICD-10 and cohabitant family members who were free from psychiatric diagnoses. Resilience was assessed using the 25-item Resilience Scale (RS). Other assessments included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being Scale (FACIT) and Kasen et al.'s (2012) scale for spirituality/religiosity; and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). Results One hundred outpatients with depression (mean ± SD age, 50.8 ± 14.5 years; 44 men; MADRS total score 9.8 ± 9.0) and 36 healthy family members (mean ± SD age, 56.5 ± 15.0 years; 18 men) were included. Symptom severity, attendance at religious/spiritual services, and self-esteem were significantly associated with RS scores in the patient group. RS total scores were significantly higher in remitted patients compared to non-remitted patients (mean ± SD, 112.3 ± 17.1 vs. 84.8 ± 27.7, p < 0.001). No correlation was found in RS total scores between patients and their family members (p = 0.265), regardless of patients' remission status. Conclusions Resilience may be influenced by individual characteristics rather than familial environment; furthermore, self-esteem or spirituality/religiosity may represent reinforcing elements. While caution is necessary in extrapolating these findings to other patient populations, our results suggest that resilience may be considered a state marker in depression.

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