Responsibility for reporting patient death due to hospital error in Japan when an error occurred at a referring institution.

Shoichi Maeda, Jay Starkey, Etsuko Kamishiraki, Noriaki Ikeda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In Japan, physicians are required to report unexpected health care-associated patient deaths to the police. Patients needing to be transferred to another institution often have complex medical problems. If a medical error occurs, it may be either at the final or the referring institution. Some fear that liability will fall on the final institution regardless of where the error occurred or that the referring facility may oppose such reporting, leading to a failure to report to police or to recommend an autopsy. Little is known about the actual opinions of physicians and risk managers in this regard. The authors sent standardised, self-administered questionnaires to all hospitals in Japan that participate in the national general residency program. Most physicians and risk managers in Japan indicated that they would report a patient's death to the police where the patient has been transferred. Of those who indicated they would not report to the police, the majority still indicated they would recommend an autopsy

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationJournal of law and medicine
Pages441-446
Number of pages6
Volume21
Edition2
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Police
Japan
police
death
responsibility
physician
Physicians
Autopsy
manager
Medical Errors
Internship and Residency
liability
Fear
health care
anxiety
Delivery of Health Care
questionnaire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Law

Cite this

Maeda, S., Starkey, J., Kamishiraki, E., & Ikeda, N. (2013). Responsibility for reporting patient death due to hospital error in Japan when an error occurred at a referring institution. In Journal of law and medicine (2 ed., Vol. 21, pp. 441-446)

Responsibility for reporting patient death due to hospital error in Japan when an error occurred at a referring institution. / Maeda, Shoichi; Starkey, Jay; Kamishiraki, Etsuko; Ikeda, Noriaki.

Journal of law and medicine. Vol. 21 2. ed. 2013. p. 441-446.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Maeda, S, Starkey, J, Kamishiraki, E & Ikeda, N 2013, Responsibility for reporting patient death due to hospital error in Japan when an error occurred at a referring institution. in Journal of law and medicine. 2 edn, vol. 21, pp. 441-446.
Maeda S, Starkey J, Kamishiraki E, Ikeda N. Responsibility for reporting patient death due to hospital error in Japan when an error occurred at a referring institution. In Journal of law and medicine. 2 ed. Vol. 21. 2013. p. 441-446
Maeda, Shoichi ; Starkey, Jay ; Kamishiraki, Etsuko ; Ikeda, Noriaki. / Responsibility for reporting patient death due to hospital error in Japan when an error occurred at a referring institution. Journal of law and medicine. Vol. 21 2. ed. 2013. pp. 441-446
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