Results of a phase I clinical study using autologous tumour lysate-pulsed monocyte-derived mature dendritic cell vaccinations for stage IV malignant melanoma patients combined with low dose interleukin-2

Hitomi Nagayama, Katsuaki Sato, Mariko Morishita, Kaoru Uchimaru, Naoki Oyaizu, Takeshi Inazawa, Tomoko Yamasaki, Makoto Enomoto, Takashi Nakaoka, Tetsuya Nakamura, Taira Maekawa, Akifumi Yamamoto, Shinji Shimada, Toshiaki Saida, Yutaka Kawakami, Shigetaka Asano, Kenzaburo Tani, Tsuneo A. Takahashi, Naohide Yamashita

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66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility and efficacy of immunotherapy for stage IV malignant melanoma patients resistant to conventional therapies involving vaccination with mature dendritic cells (mDCs) combined with administration of low dose interleukin-2, Autologous monocytes were harvested from a single apheresis and cultured for 7 days with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4, yielding immature dendritic cells (iDCs), which were then cryopreserved until use. For 4 days prior to vaccination, iDCs were exposed to autologous tumour lysate combined with tumour necrosis factor-α to induce terminal differentiation into mDCs. Patients were then vaccinated weekly with 107 mDCs for 10 weeks and given 350-700 kIU of interleukin-2 three times per week. Of the 10 patients in the study, one showed stable disease, seven showed progressive disease, and two showed mixed responses, including partial tumour regression, and were therefore given 20 additional injections. Only minimal adverse events were noted, including localized skin reactions and mild fever (NIH-CTC grade 0-1). Median survival from the first vaccination was 240 days (range 31-735 days). In vitro, melanoma patient-derived dendritic cells (DCs) showed reduced cell surface expression of CD1a antigen on iDCs and reduced CD86 and HLA-DR expression on mDCs. In addition, antigen uptake, chemotaxis and antigen presentation were all attenuated in DCs from the patients. In summary, although improvement of clinical efficacy will require further research, autologous tumour lysate-pulsed monocytederived mDCs could be safely harvested, cryopreserved and administrated to patients without obvious complications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)521-530
Number of pages10
JournalMelanoma Research
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Oct 1

Keywords

  • Dendritic cells
  • Human
  • Immunotherapy
  • Melanoma
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Dermatology
  • Cancer Research

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    Nagayama, H., Sato, K., Morishita, M., Uchimaru, K., Oyaizu, N., Inazawa, T., Yamasaki, T., Enomoto, M., Nakaoka, T., Nakamura, T., Maekawa, T., Yamamoto, A., Shimada, S., Saida, T., Kawakami, Y., Asano, S., Tani, K., Takahashi, T. A., & Yamashita, N. (2003). Results of a phase I clinical study using autologous tumour lysate-pulsed monocyte-derived mature dendritic cell vaccinations for stage IV malignant melanoma patients combined with low dose interleukin-2. Melanoma Research, 13(5), 521-530. https://doi.org/10.1097/00008390-200310000-00011