RGD-conjugated human ferritin nanoparticles for imaging vascular inflammation and angiogenesis in experimental carotid and aortic disease

Toshiro Kitagawa, Hisanori Kosuge, Masaki Uchida, Monica M. Dua, Yasunori Iida, Ronald L. Dalman, Trevor Douglas, Michael V. McConnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Inflammation and angiogenesis are important contributors to vascular disease. We evaluated imaging both of these biological processes, using Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-conjugated human ferritin nanoparticles (HFn), in experimental carotid and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease. Procedures: Macrophage-rich carotid lesions were induced by ligation in hyperlipidemic and diabetic FVB mice (n=16). AAAs were induced by angiotensin II infusion in apoE -/- mice (n=10). HFn, with or without RGD peptide, was labeled with Cy5.5 and injected intravenously for nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. Results: RGD-HFn showed significantly higher signal than HFn in diseased carotids and AAAs relative to non-diseased regions, both in situ (carotid: 1.88±0.30 vs. 1.17±0.10, p=0.04; AAA: 2.59±0.24 vs. 1.82±0.16, p=0.03) and ex vivo. Histology showed RGD-HFn colocalized with macrophages in carotids and both macrophages and neoangiogenesis in AAA lesions. Conclusions: RGD-HFn enhances vascular molecular imaging by targeting both vascular inflammation and angiogenesis, and allows more comprehensive detection of high-risk atherosclerotic and aneurysmal vascular diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)315-324
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular Imaging and Biology
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jun 1

Keywords

  • Aneurysms
  • Angiogenesis
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Ferritin
  • Inflammation
  • Nanoparticles
  • RGD
  • Vascular disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

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