Rise rate and timing variability of surface electromyographic activity during rhythmic drumming movements in the world's fastest drummer

Shinya Fujii, Toshio Moritani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The winner of an international contest to find the world's fastest drummer (WFD) can perform repetitive wrist tapping movements with one hand using a handheld drumstick at 10. Hz, much faster than the maximum tapping frequency of 5-7. Hz in the general population. The muscle activity facilitating this improved performance, however, has only recently been explored. The present study investigated the rise rate and timing variability of surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of wrist flexor/extensor muscles in the WFD, and compared them with those in two control groups: non-drummers (NDs) and ordinary drummers (ODs). The WFD showed more rapid EMG amplitude rise, earlier decline of EMG activity, and more stable muscle activation time than the NDs and ODs. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the EMG rise rate and the duration of drum training in the group of drummers (i.e., ODs and WFD). These results indicate that the 10-Hz performance of the WFD was achieved by a 'sharper' and 'less noisy' burst pattern of wrist muscles, and that drum training would have the effect to increase the speed of development of muscle tension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-66
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Electromyography and Kinesiology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Feb
Externally publishedYes

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Wrist
Muscles
Muscle Tonus
Hand
Control Groups
Population

Keywords

  • Electromyography
  • Neural adaptation
  • Tapping
  • Variability
  • World's fastest drummer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Biophysics
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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