Risk factors for motor vehicle collisions in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma

A multicenter prospective cohort study

Kenya Yuki, Sachiko Awano-Tanabe, Takeshi Ono, Daisuke Shiba, Hiroshi Murata, Ryo Asaoka, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To identify the incidence rate of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) in patients with no ocular pathology other than primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and determine the putative risk factors for MVCs in this group of patients. Methods: We designed a prospective cohort study across three centers utilizing a consecutive sampling method to identify all patients with POAG between the ages of 40 and 80 years old. Patients with glaucoma were consecutively screened for eligibility. All study participants answered a questionnaire about motor vehicle collisions at baseline, and answered the questionnaire again every 12 months (± 1 month) after baseline for three years. A binocular integrated visual field was calculated for each patient by merging a patient's monocular Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) visual fields (VFs), using the 'best sensitivity' method. Patients with incident MVCs were defined as the "MVC+" group and patients without incident MVCs were defined as the "MVC-" group. Adjusted odds ratios for the incidence of MVCs were estimated with a logistic regression model. Results: One hundred and ninety-one Japanese POAG patients were analyzed in this study. The age of the participants was 63.7 ± 10.2 [mean ± standard deviation]. A total of 28 participants experienced a MVC during the follow up period of three years (4.9% per year). Ten patients (5.2%) experienced a MVC in the first year, 13 patients (6.8%) in the second year, and 11 patients (5.8%) in the third year (some patients experienced multiple MVCs over different years). Best corrected visual acuity in the worst eye was significantly worse in the MVC+ group (0.03 ± 0.01, mean ± standard deviation, LogMar) compared with the MVC-group (0.01 ± 0.003, p = 0.01), and was the only variable identified as a significant predictor of future MVCs in the multiple logistic regression model [odds ratio: 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1 to 1.4]. Conclusion: Deterioration in visual acuity in the worst eye is a risk factor for future MVCs in patients with POAG.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0166943
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Nov 1

Fingerprint

glaucoma
Motor Vehicles
cohort studies
Cohort Studies
risk factors
Prospective Studies
Logistic Models
eyes
Primary Open Angle Glaucoma
Visual Fields
odds ratio
Visual Acuity
Logistics
questionnaires
Odds Ratio
incidence
Binoculars
Incidence
Pathology
Merging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Risk factors for motor vehicle collisions in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma : A multicenter prospective cohort study. / Yuki, Kenya; Awano-Tanabe, Sachiko; Ono, Takeshi; Shiba, Daisuke; Murata, Hiroshi; Asaoka, Ryo; Tsubota, Kazuo.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 11, e0166943, 01.11.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Yuki, Kenya

AU - Awano-Tanabe, Sachiko

AU - Ono, Takeshi

AU - Shiba, Daisuke

AU - Murata, Hiroshi

AU - Asaoka, Ryo

AU - Tsubota, Kazuo

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N2 - Purpose: To identify the incidence rate of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) in patients with no ocular pathology other than primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and determine the putative risk factors for MVCs in this group of patients. Methods: We designed a prospective cohort study across three centers utilizing a consecutive sampling method to identify all patients with POAG between the ages of 40 and 80 years old. Patients with glaucoma were consecutively screened for eligibility. All study participants answered a questionnaire about motor vehicle collisions at baseline, and answered the questionnaire again every 12 months (± 1 month) after baseline for three years. A binocular integrated visual field was calculated for each patient by merging a patient's monocular Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) visual fields (VFs), using the 'best sensitivity' method. Patients with incident MVCs were defined as the "MVC+" group and patients without incident MVCs were defined as the "MVC-" group. Adjusted odds ratios for the incidence of MVCs were estimated with a logistic regression model. Results: One hundred and ninety-one Japanese POAG patients were analyzed in this study. The age of the participants was 63.7 ± 10.2 [mean ± standard deviation]. A total of 28 participants experienced a MVC during the follow up period of three years (4.9% per year). Ten patients (5.2%) experienced a MVC in the first year, 13 patients (6.8%) in the second year, and 11 patients (5.8%) in the third year (some patients experienced multiple MVCs over different years). Best corrected visual acuity in the worst eye was significantly worse in the MVC+ group (0.03 ± 0.01, mean ± standard deviation, LogMar) compared with the MVC-group (0.01 ± 0.003, p = 0.01), and was the only variable identified as a significant predictor of future MVCs in the multiple logistic regression model [odds ratio: 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1 to 1.4]. Conclusion: Deterioration in visual acuity in the worst eye is a risk factor for future MVCs in patients with POAG.

AB - Purpose: To identify the incidence rate of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) in patients with no ocular pathology other than primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and determine the putative risk factors for MVCs in this group of patients. Methods: We designed a prospective cohort study across three centers utilizing a consecutive sampling method to identify all patients with POAG between the ages of 40 and 80 years old. Patients with glaucoma were consecutively screened for eligibility. All study participants answered a questionnaire about motor vehicle collisions at baseline, and answered the questionnaire again every 12 months (± 1 month) after baseline for three years. A binocular integrated visual field was calculated for each patient by merging a patient's monocular Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA) visual fields (VFs), using the 'best sensitivity' method. Patients with incident MVCs were defined as the "MVC+" group and patients without incident MVCs were defined as the "MVC-" group. Adjusted odds ratios for the incidence of MVCs were estimated with a logistic regression model. Results: One hundred and ninety-one Japanese POAG patients were analyzed in this study. The age of the participants was 63.7 ± 10.2 [mean ± standard deviation]. A total of 28 participants experienced a MVC during the follow up period of three years (4.9% per year). Ten patients (5.2%) experienced a MVC in the first year, 13 patients (6.8%) in the second year, and 11 patients (5.8%) in the third year (some patients experienced multiple MVCs over different years). Best corrected visual acuity in the worst eye was significantly worse in the MVC+ group (0.03 ± 0.01, mean ± standard deviation, LogMar) compared with the MVC-group (0.01 ± 0.003, p = 0.01), and was the only variable identified as a significant predictor of future MVCs in the multiple logistic regression model [odds ratio: 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1 to 1.4]. Conclusion: Deterioration in visual acuity in the worst eye is a risk factor for future MVCs in patients with POAG.

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