Risk Factors for Postoperative Delirium After Gastrectomy in Gastric Cancer Patients

Shinsaku Honda, Kenichiro Furukawa, Noriyuki Nishiwaki, Keiichi Fujiya, Hayato Omori, Sanae Kaji, Rie Makuuchi, Tomoyuki Irino, Yutaka Tanizawa, Etsuro Bando, Taiichi Kawamura, Masanori Terashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The incidence of postoperative delirium is reported to range from 9 to 87%; however, no report has focused on cases of postoperative delirium in gastric cancer surgery alone. Therefore, we investigated the incidence of and risk factors for postoperative delirium after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Methods: A total of 1037 patients who underwent surgery were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups—those with (delirium group) or without (non-delirium group) postoperative delirium—and their backgrounds were compared. The short-term outcomes and the overall survival were also investigated. Results: Postoperative delirium was observed in 47 of 1037 patients (4.5%). A multivariate analysis revealed that male gender, age ≥ 75 years, a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the habitual use of sleeping pills were independent predictive factors for postoperative delirium. The postoperative hospital stay was significantly longer in the postoperative delirium group than in the non-delirium group. Postoperative delirium was significantly associated with postoperative complications. The 3-year overall survival was 74.3% in the delirium group and 85.5% in the non-delirium group (log-rank p = 0.006). A multivariate analysis revealed that postoperative delirium was an independent prognostic factor, along with the age and cancer stage. Conclusion: The incidence of postoperative delirium was 4.5% in gastric cancer patients. Male gender, age ≥ 75 years, a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the habitual use of narcoleptic agents were risk factors for postoperative delirium after gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. Postoperative delirium was strongly associated with other postoperative complications and a poor survival after surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3669-3675
Number of pages7
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume42
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 1
Externally publishedYes

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Delirium
Gastrectomy
Stomach Neoplasms
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Survival
Incidence
Multivariate Analysis
Length of Stay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Honda, S., Furukawa, K., Nishiwaki, N., Fujiya, K., Omori, H., Kaji, S., ... Terashima, M. (2018). Risk Factors for Postoperative Delirium After Gastrectomy in Gastric Cancer Patients. World Journal of Surgery, 42(11), 3669-3675. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00268-018-4682-y

Risk Factors for Postoperative Delirium After Gastrectomy in Gastric Cancer Patients. / Honda, Shinsaku; Furukawa, Kenichiro; Nishiwaki, Noriyuki; Fujiya, Keiichi; Omori, Hayato; Kaji, Sanae; Makuuchi, Rie; Irino, Tomoyuki; Tanizawa, Yutaka; Bando, Etsuro; Kawamura, Taiichi; Terashima, Masanori.

In: World Journal of Surgery, Vol. 42, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 3669-3675.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Honda, S, Furukawa, K, Nishiwaki, N, Fujiya, K, Omori, H, Kaji, S, Makuuchi, R, Irino, T, Tanizawa, Y, Bando, E, Kawamura, T & Terashima, M 2018, 'Risk Factors for Postoperative Delirium After Gastrectomy in Gastric Cancer Patients', World Journal of Surgery, vol. 42, no. 11, pp. 3669-3675. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00268-018-4682-y
Honda S, Furukawa K, Nishiwaki N, Fujiya K, Omori H, Kaji S et al. Risk Factors for Postoperative Delirium After Gastrectomy in Gastric Cancer Patients. World Journal of Surgery. 2018 Nov 1;42(11):3669-3675. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00268-018-4682-y
Honda, Shinsaku ; Furukawa, Kenichiro ; Nishiwaki, Noriyuki ; Fujiya, Keiichi ; Omori, Hayato ; Kaji, Sanae ; Makuuchi, Rie ; Irino, Tomoyuki ; Tanizawa, Yutaka ; Bando, Etsuro ; Kawamura, Taiichi ; Terashima, Masanori. / Risk Factors for Postoperative Delirium After Gastrectomy in Gastric Cancer Patients. In: World Journal of Surgery. 2018 ; Vol. 42, No. 11. pp. 3669-3675.
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abstract = "Purpose: The incidence of postoperative delirium is reported to range from 9 to 87{\%}; however, no report has focused on cases of postoperative delirium in gastric cancer surgery alone. Therefore, we investigated the incidence of and risk factors for postoperative delirium after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Methods: A total of 1037 patients who underwent surgery were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups—those with (delirium group) or without (non-delirium group) postoperative delirium—and their backgrounds were compared. The short-term outcomes and the overall survival were also investigated. Results: Postoperative delirium was observed in 47 of 1037 patients (4.5{\%}). A multivariate analysis revealed that male gender, age ≥ 75 years, a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the habitual use of sleeping pills were independent predictive factors for postoperative delirium. The postoperative hospital stay was significantly longer in the postoperative delirium group than in the non-delirium group. Postoperative delirium was significantly associated with postoperative complications. The 3-year overall survival was 74.3{\%} in the delirium group and 85.5{\%} in the non-delirium group (log-rank p = 0.006). A multivariate analysis revealed that postoperative delirium was an independent prognostic factor, along with the age and cancer stage. Conclusion: The incidence of postoperative delirium was 4.5{\%} in gastric cancer patients. Male gender, age ≥ 75 years, a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the habitual use of narcoleptic agents were risk factors for postoperative delirium after gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. Postoperative delirium was strongly associated with other postoperative complications and a poor survival after surgery.",
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AU - Furukawa, Kenichiro

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AU - Omori, Hayato

AU - Kaji, Sanae

AU - Makuuchi, Rie

AU - Irino, Tomoyuki

AU - Tanizawa, Yutaka

AU - Bando, Etsuro

AU - Kawamura, Taiichi

AU - Terashima, Masanori

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N2 - Purpose: The incidence of postoperative delirium is reported to range from 9 to 87%; however, no report has focused on cases of postoperative delirium in gastric cancer surgery alone. Therefore, we investigated the incidence of and risk factors for postoperative delirium after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Methods: A total of 1037 patients who underwent surgery were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups—those with (delirium group) or without (non-delirium group) postoperative delirium—and their backgrounds were compared. The short-term outcomes and the overall survival were also investigated. Results: Postoperative delirium was observed in 47 of 1037 patients (4.5%). A multivariate analysis revealed that male gender, age ≥ 75 years, a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the habitual use of sleeping pills were independent predictive factors for postoperative delirium. The postoperative hospital stay was significantly longer in the postoperative delirium group than in the non-delirium group. Postoperative delirium was significantly associated with postoperative complications. The 3-year overall survival was 74.3% in the delirium group and 85.5% in the non-delirium group (log-rank p = 0.006). A multivariate analysis revealed that postoperative delirium was an independent prognostic factor, along with the age and cancer stage. Conclusion: The incidence of postoperative delirium was 4.5% in gastric cancer patients. Male gender, age ≥ 75 years, a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the habitual use of narcoleptic agents were risk factors for postoperative delirium after gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. Postoperative delirium was strongly associated with other postoperative complications and a poor survival after surgery.

AB - Purpose: The incidence of postoperative delirium is reported to range from 9 to 87%; however, no report has focused on cases of postoperative delirium in gastric cancer surgery alone. Therefore, we investigated the incidence of and risk factors for postoperative delirium after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Methods: A total of 1037 patients who underwent surgery were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups—those with (delirium group) or without (non-delirium group) postoperative delirium—and their backgrounds were compared. The short-term outcomes and the overall survival were also investigated. Results: Postoperative delirium was observed in 47 of 1037 patients (4.5%). A multivariate analysis revealed that male gender, age ≥ 75 years, a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the habitual use of sleeping pills were independent predictive factors for postoperative delirium. The postoperative hospital stay was significantly longer in the postoperative delirium group than in the non-delirium group. Postoperative delirium was significantly associated with postoperative complications. The 3-year overall survival was 74.3% in the delirium group and 85.5% in the non-delirium group (log-rank p = 0.006). A multivariate analysis revealed that postoperative delirium was an independent prognostic factor, along with the age and cancer stage. Conclusion: The incidence of postoperative delirium was 4.5% in gastric cancer patients. Male gender, age ≥ 75 years, a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the habitual use of narcoleptic agents were risk factors for postoperative delirium after gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. Postoperative delirium was strongly associated with other postoperative complications and a poor survival after surgery.

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