Roasted Coffee Reduces β-Amyloid Production by Increasing Proteasomal β-Secretase Degradation in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells

Kazuya Fukuyama, Shota Kakio, Yosuke Nakazawa, Kenji Kobata, Megumi Tago, Toshiharu Suzuki, Hiroomi Tamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Scope: Epidemiological studies have shown that coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of developing several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caffeine is a prominent candidate component underlying the preventive effects of coffee; however, the contribution of other constituents is unclear. To clarify this issue, the effect of roasting coffee beans on β-secretase (BACE1) expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells is investigated. Methods and results: Coffee (2%) reduces Aβ accumulation in culture medium to 80% of control levels after 24 h. Accordingly, BACE1 expression is decreased to 70% of control levels at 12 h. Experiments using cycloheximide and MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, reveal that coffee enhanced BACE1 degradation through activation of proteasomal activity. Furthermore, coffee activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and consequently, phosphorylation of a serine residue of proteasome 26S subunit, non-ATPase 11 (PSMD11). Pyrocatechol, a strong antioxidant known as catechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene, produced from chlorogenic acid during roasting, also reduces BACE1 expression by activation of proteasomal activity. Furthermore, pyrocatechol reduces Aβ production in SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusion: The data suggest that the roasting process may be crucial for the protective effects of coffee consumption in AD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMolecular Nutrition and Food Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases
Coffee
roasting
amyloid
pyrocatechol
Neuroblastoma
Amyloid
proteasome endopeptidase complex
Alzheimer disease
degradation
coffee beans
cAMP-dependent protein kinase
nervous system diseases
catechol
cycloheximide
cells
chlorogenic acid
caffeine
epidemiological studies
serine

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • coffee
  • SH-SY5Y
  • β-secretase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science

Cite this

@article{ea36fee871894092a17bd9c6c02d3ade,
title = "Roasted Coffee Reduces β-Amyloid Production by Increasing Proteasomal β-Secretase Degradation in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells",
abstract = "Scope: Epidemiological studies have shown that coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of developing several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caffeine is a prominent candidate component underlying the preventive effects of coffee; however, the contribution of other constituents is unclear. To clarify this issue, the effect of roasting coffee beans on β-secretase (BACE1) expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells is investigated. Methods and results: Coffee (2{\%}) reduces Aβ accumulation in culture medium to 80{\%} of control levels after 24 h. Accordingly, BACE1 expression is decreased to 70{\%} of control levels at 12 h. Experiments using cycloheximide and MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, reveal that coffee enhanced BACE1 degradation through activation of proteasomal activity. Furthermore, coffee activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and consequently, phosphorylation of a serine residue of proteasome 26S subunit, non-ATPase 11 (PSMD11). Pyrocatechol, a strong antioxidant known as catechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene, produced from chlorogenic acid during roasting, also reduces BACE1 expression by activation of proteasomal activity. Furthermore, pyrocatechol reduces Aβ production in SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusion: The data suggest that the roasting process may be crucial for the protective effects of coffee consumption in AD.",
keywords = "Alzheimer's disease, Aβ, coffee, SH-SY5Y, β-secretase",
author = "Kazuya Fukuyama and Shota Kakio and Yosuke Nakazawa and Kenji Kobata and Megumi Tago and Toshiharu Suzuki and Hiroomi Tamura",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/mnfr.201800238",
language = "English",
journal = "Molecular Nutrition and Food Research",
issn = "1613-4125",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Roasted Coffee Reduces β-Amyloid Production by Increasing Proteasomal β-Secretase Degradation in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells

AU - Fukuyama, Kazuya

AU - Kakio, Shota

AU - Nakazawa, Yosuke

AU - Kobata, Kenji

AU - Tago, Megumi

AU - Suzuki, Toshiharu

AU - Tamura, Hiroomi

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Scope: Epidemiological studies have shown that coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of developing several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caffeine is a prominent candidate component underlying the preventive effects of coffee; however, the contribution of other constituents is unclear. To clarify this issue, the effect of roasting coffee beans on β-secretase (BACE1) expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells is investigated. Methods and results: Coffee (2%) reduces Aβ accumulation in culture medium to 80% of control levels after 24 h. Accordingly, BACE1 expression is decreased to 70% of control levels at 12 h. Experiments using cycloheximide and MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, reveal that coffee enhanced BACE1 degradation through activation of proteasomal activity. Furthermore, coffee activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and consequently, phosphorylation of a serine residue of proteasome 26S subunit, non-ATPase 11 (PSMD11). Pyrocatechol, a strong antioxidant known as catechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene, produced from chlorogenic acid during roasting, also reduces BACE1 expression by activation of proteasomal activity. Furthermore, pyrocatechol reduces Aβ production in SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusion: The data suggest that the roasting process may be crucial for the protective effects of coffee consumption in AD.

AB - Scope: Epidemiological studies have shown that coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of developing several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caffeine is a prominent candidate component underlying the preventive effects of coffee; however, the contribution of other constituents is unclear. To clarify this issue, the effect of roasting coffee beans on β-secretase (BACE1) expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells is investigated. Methods and results: Coffee (2%) reduces Aβ accumulation in culture medium to 80% of control levels after 24 h. Accordingly, BACE1 expression is decreased to 70% of control levels at 12 h. Experiments using cycloheximide and MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, reveal that coffee enhanced BACE1 degradation through activation of proteasomal activity. Furthermore, coffee activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and consequently, phosphorylation of a serine residue of proteasome 26S subunit, non-ATPase 11 (PSMD11). Pyrocatechol, a strong antioxidant known as catechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene, produced from chlorogenic acid during roasting, also reduces BACE1 expression by activation of proteasomal activity. Furthermore, pyrocatechol reduces Aβ production in SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusion: The data suggest that the roasting process may be crucial for the protective effects of coffee consumption in AD.

KW - Alzheimer's disease

KW - Aβ

KW - coffee

KW - SH-SY5Y

KW - β-secretase

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052969804&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85052969804&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/mnfr.201800238

DO - 10.1002/mnfr.201800238

M3 - Article

JO - Molecular Nutrition and Food Research

JF - Molecular Nutrition and Food Research

SN - 1613-4125

ER -