Role of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma: Consensus at the symposium of the 48th annual meeting of the liver cancer study group of Japan

Masatoshi Kudo, Osamu Matsui, Michiie Sakamoto, Azusa Kitao, Tonsok Kim, Shun Ichi Ariizumi, Tomoaki Ichikawa, Satoshi Kobayashi, Yasuharu Imai, Namiki Izumi, Yasunari Fujinaga, Shigeki Arii

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23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We summarize here the consensus reached at the Symposium of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan held in Kanazawa on July 20th and 21st, 2012, on the role of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, dynamic CT is the first choice of imaging modality when HCC is suspected. EOB-MRI is useful for differentiation and definitive diagnosis of HCC when dynamic CT/MRI does not show conclusive findings for HCC. In addition, contrast-enhanced ultrasound with Sonazoid is useful for making a decision on whether or not to treat a hypovascular lesion <1 cm when the nodules are shown with low intensity in the hepatocyte phase of EOB-MRI. Furthermore, EOB-MRI should be performed in selected cases of HCC ultrahigh-risk groups every 3-4 months, or EOB-MRI should be performed at least once at the first visit in all HCC ultrahigh-risk groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-27
Number of pages7
JournalOncology (Switzerland)
Volume84
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Apr 14

Keywords

  • EOB-MRI
  • Expert consensus
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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