Roles of renal proximal tubule transport in acid/base balance and blood pressure regulation

Motonobu Nakamura, Ayumi Shirai, Osamu Yamazaki, Nobuhiko Satoh, Masashi Suzuki, Shoko Horita, Hideomi Yamada, George Seki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sodium-coupled bicarbonate absorption from renal proximal tubules (PTs) plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of systemic acid/base balance. Indeed, mutations in the Na+-HCO3- cotransporter NBCe1, which mediates a majority of bicarbonate exit from PTs, cause severe proximal renal tubular acidosis associated with ocular and other extrarenal abnormalities. Sodium transport in PTs also plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. For example, PT transport stimulation by insulin may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension associated with insulin resistance. Type 1 angiotensin (Ang) II receptors in PT are critical for blood pressure homeostasis. Paradoxically, the effects of Ang II on PT transport are known to be biphasic. Unlike in other species, however, Ang II is recently shown to dose-dependently stimulate human PT transport via nitric oxide/cGMP/ERK pathway, which may represent a novel therapeutic target in human hypertension. In this paper, we will review the physiological and pathophysiological roles of PT transport.

Original languageEnglish
Article number504808
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pressure regulation
Proximal Kidney Tubule
Acid-Base Equilibrium
Blood pressure
Bicarbonates
Angiotensin II
Sodium
Insulin
Renal Tubular Acidosis
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Angiotensin Type 1 Receptor
Sodium Bicarbonate
MAP Kinase Signaling System
Insulin Resistance
Nitric Oxide
Homeostasis
Maintenance
Mutation
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Nakamura, M., Shirai, A., Yamazaki, O., Satoh, N., Suzuki, M., Horita, S., ... Seki, G. (2014). Roles of renal proximal tubule transport in acid/base balance and blood pressure regulation. BioMed Research International, 2014, [504808]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/504808

Roles of renal proximal tubule transport in acid/base balance and blood pressure regulation. / Nakamura, Motonobu; Shirai, Ayumi; Yamazaki, Osamu; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Masashi; Horita, Shoko; Yamada, Hideomi; Seki, George.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2014, 504808, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakamura, M, Shirai, A, Yamazaki, O, Satoh, N, Suzuki, M, Horita, S, Yamada, H & Seki, G 2014, 'Roles of renal proximal tubule transport in acid/base balance and blood pressure regulation', BioMed Research International, vol. 2014, 504808. https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/504808
Nakamura, Motonobu ; Shirai, Ayumi ; Yamazaki, Osamu ; Satoh, Nobuhiko ; Suzuki, Masashi ; Horita, Shoko ; Yamada, Hideomi ; Seki, George. / Roles of renal proximal tubule transport in acid/base balance and blood pressure regulation. In: BioMed Research International. 2014 ; Vol. 2014.
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