Safety and efficacy of linezolid in 16 infants and children in Japan

Masayoshi Shinjo(H), Osamu Iketani, Koota Watanabe, Naoki Shimojima, Mikihiko Kudo, Hiroyuki Yamagishi, Hiroyuki Shimada, Kayoko Sugita, Takao Takahashi, Takehiko Mori, Naoki Hasegawa, Satoshi Iwata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Linezolid, an oxazolidinone antibiotic, exhibits a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive bacteria. It hasbeen licensed for adult use in Japan since 2006 for MRSA infections, and has also been used off-label for pediatric patients.At our university hospital, a total of 16 infants and children (including one non-Japanese Asian) were administered linezolidowing to infection with multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, after consent had been provided. All patients had severeunderlying diseases or indications for surgery. Eighty-eight percent of the causal microorganisms were methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and all were sensitive to linezolid.Linezolid was administered because the antecedent anti-MRSA medications were ineffective or contraindicated, orintravenous-to-oral switch therapy was requested owing to cardiac or orthopedic surgical-site infections. The median durationof administration was 13 days (range 3-31 days). The overall efficacy was 91 % (10/11) in those for whom efficacy could beevaluated. Only two patients (both teen-aged) encountered linezolid-related adverse effects (13 %, 2/16). One patient showedelevation of liver enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase [AST] and alanine aminotransferase [ALT]), requiring thatadministration be withdrawn, but enzyme levels returned to normal after the patient had been switched to vancomycin. Theother patient showed transiently decreased platelet counts. Linezolid is considered generally safe and effective for childrenin Japan, especially for those who cannot use other anti-MRSA medications or those who require oral antibiotics forinfections with multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)591-596
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infection and Chemotherapy
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Aug

Fingerprint

Linezolid
Japan
Methicillin
Safety
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Oxazolidinones
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Surgical Wound Infection
Methicillin Resistance
Coagulase
Enzymes
Vancomycin
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Infection
Alanine Transaminase
Platelet Count
Staphylococcus
Orthopedics

Keywords

  • Children
  • Linezolid
  • Off-label
  • Surgical-site infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Safety and efficacy of linezolid in 16 infants and children in Japan. / Shinjo(H), Masayoshi; Iketani, Osamu; Watanabe, Koota; Shimojima, Naoki; Kudo, Mikihiko; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Kayoko; Takahashi, Takao; Mori, Takehiko; Hasegawa, Naoki; Iwata, Satoshi.

In: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy, Vol. 18, No. 4, 08.2012, p. 591-596.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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