Screening of dry eye disease in visual display terminal workers during occupational health examinations

The Moriguchi study

Motoko Kawashima, Motoko Yamatsuji, Norihiko Yokoi, Masaki Fukui, Yoshiyuki Ichihashi, Hiroaki Kato, Mitsuko Nishida, Miki Uchino, Shigeru Kinoshita, Kazuo Tsubota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Screening of dry eye disease in visual display terminal workers during occupational health examinations: The Moriguchi study: Motoko KAWASHIMA, et al. Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine-Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of dry eye disease (DED) in Japanese visual display terminal (VDT) workers and identify simple methods for screening DED during occupational health examinations. Methods: This study involved 369 (331 men and 38 women; mean age, 44.4 [8.8] years) workers engaged in PC development with approximately 6 hours of VDT use daily. The participants completed questionnaires on dry eye and physical symptoms affecting QoL, and their ability to keep their eyes open for 10 seconds was tested for DED screening. They also underwent assessment of conjunctival and corneal vital staining with lissamine green and fluorescein, measurement of tear film breakup time, and Schirmer's test for DED diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the screening methods were assessed. Results: The DED group included 218 (definite, 14; probable, 204) participants. They had markedly high frequencies of 11 dry eye symptoms, especially ocular fatigue (OR, 17.1; 95% CI, 9.9 to 29.7) and dry sensation (OR, 8.2; 95% CI, 3.6 to 18.4), and were more often unable to keep their eyes open for 10 s. With either ocular fatigue or dry sensation as the cutoff criterion, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were 89.9, 66.9, and 79.7%, respectively. Conclusions: Approximately 60% of the VDT workers were diagnosed with DED on the basis of diverse eye symptoms affecting their ability to work. The dry eye symptom questionnaire and 10-s eye-opening workerstest are simple, noninvasive, and inexpensive methods for screening DED during occupational health examinations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-258
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Occupational Health
Volume57
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Eye Diseases
Occupational Health
Screening
Display devices
Health
Occupational diseases
Asthenopia
Aptitude
Fatigue of materials
Ophthalmology
Fluorescein
Sensitivity and Specificity
Medicine
Tears
Staining and Labeling

Keywords

  • Dry eye disease
  • Occupational health examination
  • Ophthalmologists
  • Quality of life
  • Screening
  • Visual display terminal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Screening of dry eye disease in visual display terminal workers during occupational health examinations : The Moriguchi study. / Kawashima, Motoko; Yamatsuji, Motoko; Yokoi, Norihiko; Fukui, Masaki; Ichihashi, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Hiroaki; Nishida, Mitsuko; Uchino, Miki; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Tsubota, Kazuo.

In: Journal of Occupational Health, Vol. 57, No. 3, 2015, p. 253-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawashima, M, Yamatsuji, M, Yokoi, N, Fukui, M, Ichihashi, Y, Kato, H, Nishida, M, Uchino, M, Kinoshita, S & Tsubota, K 2015, 'Screening of dry eye disease in visual display terminal workers during occupational health examinations: The Moriguchi study', Journal of Occupational Health, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 253-258.
Kawashima, Motoko ; Yamatsuji, Motoko ; Yokoi, Norihiko ; Fukui, Masaki ; Ichihashi, Yoshiyuki ; Kato, Hiroaki ; Nishida, Mitsuko ; Uchino, Miki ; Kinoshita, Shigeru ; Tsubota, Kazuo. / Screening of dry eye disease in visual display terminal workers during occupational health examinations : The Moriguchi study. In: Journal of Occupational Health. 2015 ; Vol. 57, No. 3. pp. 253-258.
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