Seasonal changes in indoor airborne fungal concentration in a hematology ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is an important infectious complication of hematological disorders, especially in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. Evidences suggest seasonal and/or geographical variations in the airborne fungal counts and a relationship between those counts and the incidence of IFD. We evaluated the concentrations of indoor airborne fungi quantitated over the course of one year in a hematology ward in Japan. In January, April, July, and October, fixed volumes of air samples were obtained by an air sampler in a hematology ward not equipped with a high-efficiency particulate air filter and incubated in fugal cultures. Samples were also obtained from a protective environment in the same ward and were evaluated. The number of fungal colonies per 50 L of sampled air was highest in October (median 2.25 (range, 0.2–7.0)), which was significantly higher than those in the other three months (0.1 (range, 0–1.0) in January; 0 (0-0) in April; 0.55 (0–2.5) in July; P < 0.01)). Commonly identified pathogens included Penicillium and Cladosrporium species, but Aspergillus species was detected only in July and October samples. These results suggest a seasonal variation in indoor airborne fungal concentrations in Japan, which could affect the epidemiology of IFD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Infection and Chemotherapy
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Mycoses
Hematology
Air
Japan
Air Filters
Microbial Colony Count
Penicillium
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Aspergillus
Epidemiology
Fungi
Incidence

Keywords

  • Airborne fungus
  • Fungus
  • Hematology ward
  • Invasive fungal disease
  • Seasonal change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Seasonal changes in indoor airborne fungal concentration in a hematology ward",
abstract = "Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is an important infectious complication of hematological disorders, especially in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. Evidences suggest seasonal and/or geographical variations in the airborne fungal counts and a relationship between those counts and the incidence of IFD. We evaluated the concentrations of indoor airborne fungi quantitated over the course of one year in a hematology ward in Japan. In January, April, July, and October, fixed volumes of air samples were obtained by an air sampler in a hematology ward not equipped with a high-efficiency particulate air filter and incubated in fugal cultures. Samples were also obtained from a protective environment in the same ward and were evaluated. The number of fungal colonies per 50 L of sampled air was highest in October (median 2.25 (range, 0.2–7.0)), which was significantly higher than those in the other three months (0.1 (range, 0–1.0) in January; 0 (0-0) in April; 0.55 (0–2.5) in July; P < 0.01)). Commonly identified pathogens included Penicillium and Cladosrporium species, but Aspergillus species was detected only in July and October samples. These results suggest a seasonal variation in indoor airborne fungal concentrations in Japan, which could affect the epidemiology of IFD.",
keywords = "Airborne fungus, Fungus, Hematology ward, Invasive fungal disease, Seasonal change",
author = "Takehiko Mori and Taku Kikuchi and Jun Kato and Yuya Koda and Masatoshi Sakurai and Osamu Kikumi and Rika Inose and Mitsuru Murata and Naoki Hasegawa and Hitomi Nakayama and Rie Yamazaki and Shinichiro Okamoto",
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T1 - Seasonal changes in indoor airborne fungal concentration in a hematology ward

AU - Mori, Takehiko

AU - Kikuchi, Taku

AU - Kato, Jun

AU - Koda, Yuya

AU - Sakurai, Masatoshi

AU - Kikumi, Osamu

AU - Inose, Rika

AU - Murata, Mitsuru

AU - Hasegawa, Naoki

AU - Nakayama, Hitomi

AU - Yamazaki, Rie

AU - Okamoto, Shinichiro

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is an important infectious complication of hematological disorders, especially in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. Evidences suggest seasonal and/or geographical variations in the airborne fungal counts and a relationship between those counts and the incidence of IFD. We evaluated the concentrations of indoor airborne fungi quantitated over the course of one year in a hematology ward in Japan. In January, April, July, and October, fixed volumes of air samples were obtained by an air sampler in a hematology ward not equipped with a high-efficiency particulate air filter and incubated in fugal cultures. Samples were also obtained from a protective environment in the same ward and were evaluated. The number of fungal colonies per 50 L of sampled air was highest in October (median 2.25 (range, 0.2–7.0)), which was significantly higher than those in the other three months (0.1 (range, 0–1.0) in January; 0 (0-0) in April; 0.55 (0–2.5) in July; P < 0.01)). Commonly identified pathogens included Penicillium and Cladosrporium species, but Aspergillus species was detected only in July and October samples. These results suggest a seasonal variation in indoor airborne fungal concentrations in Japan, which could affect the epidemiology of IFD.

AB - Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is an important infectious complication of hematological disorders, especially in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. Evidences suggest seasonal and/or geographical variations in the airborne fungal counts and a relationship between those counts and the incidence of IFD. We evaluated the concentrations of indoor airborne fungi quantitated over the course of one year in a hematology ward in Japan. In January, April, July, and October, fixed volumes of air samples were obtained by an air sampler in a hematology ward not equipped with a high-efficiency particulate air filter and incubated in fugal cultures. Samples were also obtained from a protective environment in the same ward and were evaluated. The number of fungal colonies per 50 L of sampled air was highest in October (median 2.25 (range, 0.2–7.0)), which was significantly higher than those in the other three months (0.1 (range, 0–1.0) in January; 0 (0-0) in April; 0.55 (0–2.5) in July; P < 0.01)). Commonly identified pathogens included Penicillium and Cladosrporium species, but Aspergillus species was detected only in July and October samples. These results suggest a seasonal variation in indoor airborne fungal concentrations in Japan, which could affect the epidemiology of IFD.

KW - Airborne fungus

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KW - Seasonal change

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