Self-Esteem and Justice Orientation as Moderators for the Effects of Individual-Targeted and Group-Targeted Justice

Tomoki Sekiguchi, Yoichiro Hayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing on the self-interest and moral virtues perspectives of justice, we examine how self-esteem and justice orientation as individual difference factors moderate the effects of individual-targeted and group-targeted justice on helping behaviors and intention to leave. A scenario-based study was conducted using a total sample of 624 Japanese undergraduate students. The results highlighted the difference between the moderating roles of self-esteem and justice orientation. Self-esteem moderated the effect of individual-targeted procedural justice on intention to leave such that the effect was stronger when self-esteem was high. In contrast, justice orientation mainly moderated the effects of group-targeted procedural and distributive justice on helping behaviors such that the effects were weaker when justice orientation was high. Implications of our findings and future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-266
Number of pages29
JournalApplied Psychology
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Apr 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology

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