SenSkin: Adapting skin as a soft interface

Masa Ogata, Yuta Sugiura, Yasutoshi Makino, Masahiko Inami, Michita Imai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a sensing technology and input method that uses skin deformation estimated through a thin band-type device attached to the human body, the appearance of which seems socially acceptable in daily life. An input interface usually requires feedback. SenSkin provides tactile feedback that enables users to know which part of the skin they are touching in order to issue commands. The user, having found an acceptable area before beginning the input operation, can continue to input commands without receiving explicit feedback. We developed an experimental device with two armbands to sense three-dimensional pressure applied to the skin. Sensing tangential force on uncovered skin without haptic obstacles has not previously been achieved. SenSkin is also novel in that quantitative tangential force applied to the skin, such as that of the forearm or fingers, is measured. An infrared (IR) reflective sensor is used since its durability and inexpensiveness make it suitable for everyday human sensing purposes. The multiple sensors located on the two armbands allow the tangential and normal force applied to the skin dimension to be sensed. The input command is learned and recognized using a Support Vector Machine (SVM). Finally, we show an application in which this input method is implemented.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUIST 2013 - Proceedings of the 26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology
Pages539-543
Number of pages5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2013 - St. Andrews, United Kingdom
Duration: 2013 Oct 82013 Oct 11

Other

Other26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2013
CountryUnited Kingdom
CitySt. Andrews
Period13/10/813/10/11

Fingerprint

Skin
Feedback
Sensors
Support vector machines
Durability
Infrared radiation

Keywords

  • Biosensing
  • Photo-reflectivity
  • Skin deformation
  • Soft interface
  • Tactile feedback
  • Tangential force

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software

Cite this

Ogata, M., Sugiura, Y., Makino, Y., Inami, M., & Imai, M. (2013). SenSkin: Adapting skin as a soft interface. In UIST 2013 - Proceedings of the 26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (pp. 539-543) https://doi.org/10.1145/2501988.2502039

SenSkin : Adapting skin as a soft interface. / Ogata, Masa; Sugiura, Yuta; Makino, Yasutoshi; Inami, Masahiko; Imai, Michita.

UIST 2013 - Proceedings of the 26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology. 2013. p. 539-543.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ogata, M, Sugiura, Y, Makino, Y, Inami, M & Imai, M 2013, SenSkin: Adapting skin as a soft interface. in UIST 2013 - Proceedings of the 26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology. pp. 539-543, 26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2013, St. Andrews, United Kingdom, 13/10/8. https://doi.org/10.1145/2501988.2502039
Ogata M, Sugiura Y, Makino Y, Inami M, Imai M. SenSkin: Adapting skin as a soft interface. In UIST 2013 - Proceedings of the 26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology. 2013. p. 539-543 https://doi.org/10.1145/2501988.2502039
Ogata, Masa ; Sugiura, Yuta ; Makino, Yasutoshi ; Inami, Masahiko ; Imai, Michita. / SenSkin : Adapting skin as a soft interface. UIST 2013 - Proceedings of the 26th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology. 2013. pp. 539-543
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