Severe weight loss in 3 months after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT was associated with an increased risk of subsequent non-relapse mortality

Nutritional Support Working Group of the Asian Pacific Bone Marrow Transplantation

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34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) are at risk of malnutrition. To assess the impact of malnutrition after allogeneic HSCT on transplant outcomes, we conducted a retrospective study. Adult patients who received allogeneic HSCT from 2000 to 2009 for standard-risk leukemia and achieved disease-free survival up to 3 months after allogeneic HSCT were included. From participating centers, 145 patients were enrolled. Median age was 46 years (19-68). Patients were classified based on weight loss during 3 months after allogeneic HSCT as follows: normal group (weight loss <5%, n=53), mild malnutrition group (5%≤weight loss<10%, n=47), severe malnutrition group (10% ≤weight loss, n=45). The cumulative incidences of 2-year nonrelapse mortality (NRM) were 3.8% in the normal group, 8.5% in the mild malnutrition group and 27.3% in the severe malnutrition group. The probabilities of a 2-year OS were 73.2% in the normal group, 74.5% in the mild malnutrition group and 55.3% in the severe malnutrition group. In multivariate analysis, severe malnutrition was associated with an increased risk of NRM and a worse OS. In conclusion, weight loss ≥10% was associated with a worse clinical outcome. Prospective studies that identify patients at risk of malnutrition and intervention by a nutritional support team are warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-105
Number of pages6
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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