Should We Try Antiandrogen Withdrawal in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients? Insights From a Retrospective Study

Hiroshi Hongo, Takeo Kosaka, Ryuichi Mizuno, Taisuke Ezaki, Kazuhiro Matsumoto, Shinya Morita, Kazunobu Shinoda, Toshiaki Shinojima, Eiji Kikuchi, Akira Miyajima, Mototsugu Oya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In men with castration-resistant prostate cancer, it might be beneficial to withdraw antiandrogens from patients who have favorable prognostic factors for a response to such withdrawal, notably receipt of hormone therapy for a long period. Antiandrogens should not be withdrawn in patients without favorable factors and in patients with a high prostate-specific antigen level at the time of cancer diagnosis. Background It remains uncertain whether those with response to antiandrogen withdrawal (AAW) have a better prognosis. We investigated the predictors of a better response to AAW and overall survival after acquiring resistance to first-line androgen deprivation therapy inpatients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 87 CRPC patients treated at Keio University Hospital. Sixty-seven of 87 CRPC patients underwent AAW. We analyzed clinicopathologic parameters to identify predictors of survival in CRPC patients and investigated predictors of good response to AAW. Results Younger age, longer duration of androgen deprivation therapy before CRPC development, and better response to AAW were independent favorable prognostic factors for overall survival. Although better response to AAW was a favorable prognostic factor in this study, trying AAW was not significantly related to overall survival. Duration of hormone therapy was significantly longer in those whose disease responded to AAW (69.9 ± 11.0 months) than those with no response (45.3 ± 5.2 months). Conclusion The prognostic benefit of AAW was not clearly determined in this study. However, AAW might be beneficial in patients who have favorable prognostic factors for a response to AAW—that is, those who have received hormone therapy for a long period. However, AAW should not be done in patients who do not have favorable factors and who had a high prostate-specific antigen level at the time of their prostate cancer diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e569-e573
JournalClinical Genitourinary Cancer
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Dec 1

Keywords

  • Androgen deprivation therapy
  • Antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome
  • Hormone therapy
  • Nonsteroidal antiandrogens
  • Prostate-specific antigen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Urology

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