Small dense low-density lipoproteins cholesterol can predict incident cardiovascular disease in an urban Japanese cohort

The suita study

Hidenori Arai, Yoshihiro Kokubo, Makoto Watanabe, Tatsuya Sawamura, Yasuki Ito, Asako Minagawa, Tomonori Okamura, Yoshihiro Miyamato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Several lines of evidence indicate that small dense low-density lipoproteins (sd-LDL) are more atherogenic than large buoyant LDL; however, few prospective studies have addressed the role of sd-LDL in cardiovascular disease (CVD). We therefore examined the association between sd-LDL cholesterol (sd-LDL-C) and CVD in a Japanese cohort. Methods: An 11.7-year prospective study was performed using a general population aged 30-79 without a history of cardiovascular disease. Direct LDL-C and sd-LDL-C were measured in samples from 2034 participants (968 men and 1066 women). Results: During the follow-up period, there were 116 incident cases of CVD. The multivariableadjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of sd-LDL-C for CVD were calculated using a proportional hazards regression model after adjusting for age, hypertension, diabetes, use of lipid-lowering drugs, body mass index, and current smoking and alcohol drinking, and found that increasing quartiles of sd-LDL-C were associated with increased risk of CVD. We also determined that age and sex-adjusted HRs per 10 mg/dL of sd-LDL-C and HRs for CVD, stroke, cerebral infarction, and coronary artery disease were 1.21 (95% CI: 1.12-1.31), 1.17 (95% CI: 1.05-1.30), 1.15 (95% CI: 1.00-1.33), and 1.29 (95% CI: 1.14-1.45), respectively. Conclusions: It was demonstrated that sd-LDL-C was significantly associated with CVD in a Japanese population, providing evidence of sd-LDL-C as an important biomarker to predict CVD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-203
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

LDL Cholesterol
LDL Lipoproteins
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hazards
Cerebral Arterial Diseases
Prospective Studies
Cerebral Infarction
Proportional Hazards Models
Biomarkers
Alcohol Drinking
Medical problems
Population
Coronary Artery Disease
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Myocardial Infarction
Hypertension
Alcohols
Lipids
Association reactions

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Epidemiology
  • Lipids
  • Lipoproteins
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Small dense low-density lipoproteins cholesterol can predict incident cardiovascular disease in an urban Japanese cohort : The suita study. / Arai, Hidenori; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Makoto; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Ito, Yasuki; Minagawa, Asako; Okamura, Tomonori; Miyamato, Yoshihiro.

In: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis, Vol. 20, No. 2, 2013, p. 195-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arai, Hidenori ; Kokubo, Yoshihiro ; Watanabe, Makoto ; Sawamura, Tatsuya ; Ito, Yasuki ; Minagawa, Asako ; Okamura, Tomonori ; Miyamato, Yoshihiro. / Small dense low-density lipoproteins cholesterol can predict incident cardiovascular disease in an urban Japanese cohort : The suita study. In: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis. 2013 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 195-203.
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T1 - Small dense low-density lipoproteins cholesterol can predict incident cardiovascular disease in an urban Japanese cohort

T2 - The suita study

AU - Arai, Hidenori

AU - Kokubo, Yoshihiro

AU - Watanabe, Makoto

AU - Sawamura, Tatsuya

AU - Ito, Yasuki

AU - Minagawa, Asako

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Miyamato, Yoshihiro

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N2 - Aim: Several lines of evidence indicate that small dense low-density lipoproteins (sd-LDL) are more atherogenic than large buoyant LDL; however, few prospective studies have addressed the role of sd-LDL in cardiovascular disease (CVD). We therefore examined the association between sd-LDL cholesterol (sd-LDL-C) and CVD in a Japanese cohort. Methods: An 11.7-year prospective study was performed using a general population aged 30-79 without a history of cardiovascular disease. Direct LDL-C and sd-LDL-C were measured in samples from 2034 participants (968 men and 1066 women). Results: During the follow-up period, there were 116 incident cases of CVD. The multivariableadjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of sd-LDL-C for CVD were calculated using a proportional hazards regression model after adjusting for age, hypertension, diabetes, use of lipid-lowering drugs, body mass index, and current smoking and alcohol drinking, and found that increasing quartiles of sd-LDL-C were associated with increased risk of CVD. We also determined that age and sex-adjusted HRs per 10 mg/dL of sd-LDL-C and HRs for CVD, stroke, cerebral infarction, and coronary artery disease were 1.21 (95% CI: 1.12-1.31), 1.17 (95% CI: 1.05-1.30), 1.15 (95% CI: 1.00-1.33), and 1.29 (95% CI: 1.14-1.45), respectively. Conclusions: It was demonstrated that sd-LDL-C was significantly associated with CVD in a Japanese population, providing evidence of sd-LDL-C as an important biomarker to predict CVD.

AB - Aim: Several lines of evidence indicate that small dense low-density lipoproteins (sd-LDL) are more atherogenic than large buoyant LDL; however, few prospective studies have addressed the role of sd-LDL in cardiovascular disease (CVD). We therefore examined the association between sd-LDL cholesterol (sd-LDL-C) and CVD in a Japanese cohort. Methods: An 11.7-year prospective study was performed using a general population aged 30-79 without a history of cardiovascular disease. Direct LDL-C and sd-LDL-C were measured in samples from 2034 participants (968 men and 1066 women). Results: During the follow-up period, there were 116 incident cases of CVD. The multivariableadjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of sd-LDL-C for CVD were calculated using a proportional hazards regression model after adjusting for age, hypertension, diabetes, use of lipid-lowering drugs, body mass index, and current smoking and alcohol drinking, and found that increasing quartiles of sd-LDL-C were associated with increased risk of CVD. We also determined that age and sex-adjusted HRs per 10 mg/dL of sd-LDL-C and HRs for CVD, stroke, cerebral infarction, and coronary artery disease were 1.21 (95% CI: 1.12-1.31), 1.17 (95% CI: 1.05-1.30), 1.15 (95% CI: 1.00-1.33), and 1.29 (95% CI: 1.14-1.45), respectively. Conclusions: It was demonstrated that sd-LDL-C was significantly associated with CVD in a Japanese population, providing evidence of sd-LDL-C as an important biomarker to predict CVD.

KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Lipids

KW - Lipoproteins

KW - Risk factors

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