Socioeconomic Status and Knowledge of Cardiovascular Risk Factors

NIPPON DATA2010

Masayoshi Tsuji, Hisatomi Arima, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Koshi Nakamura, Toshiro Takezaki, Kiyomi Sakata, Nagako Okuda, Nobuo Nishi, Aya Kadota, Tomonori Okamura, Hirotsugu Ueshima, Akira Okayama, Katsuyuki Miura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors remains unknown in a general Japanese population.

METHODS: Of 8,815 participants from 300 randomly selected areas throughout Japan, 2,467 participants who were free of cardiovascular disease and who provided information on SES in the National Health and Nutrition Survey of Japan 2010 were enrolled in this cross-sectional analysis. SES was classified according to the employment status, length of education, marital and living statuses, and equivalent household expenditure (EHE). Outcomes were ignorance of each cardiovascular risk factor (hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, low high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, arrhythmia, and smoking) and insufficient knowledge (number of correct answers <4 out of 6).

RESULTS: A short education and low EHE were significantly associated with a greater ignorance of most cardiovascular risk factors. A short education (<10 years) was also associated with insufficient knowledge of overall cardiovascular risk factors: age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios (OR) were 1.92 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51-2.45) relative to participants with ≥13 years of education. Low EHE was also associated with insufficient knowledge (age- and sex-adjusted OR 1.24; 95% CI, 1.01-1.51 for the lowest quintile vs the upper 4 quintiles). These relationships remained significant, even after further adjustments for regular exercise, smoking, weekly alcohol consumption, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and low HDL cholesterol.

CONCLUSION: Participants with a short education and low EHE were more likely to have less knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S46-S52
JournalJournal of Epidemiology
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

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Social Class
Health Expenditures
Education
Hypercholesterolemia
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Japan
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension
Nutrition Surveys
Marital Status
Health Surveys
Alcohol Drinking
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • cardiovascular risk factor
  • education
  • general population
  • household expenditure
  • socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Tsuji, M., Arima, H., Ohkubo, T., Nakamura, K., Takezaki, T., Sakata, K., ... Miura, K. (2018). Socioeconomic Status and Knowledge of Cardiovascular Risk Factors: NIPPON DATA2010. Journal of Epidemiology, 28, S46-S52. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20170255

Socioeconomic Status and Knowledge of Cardiovascular Risk Factors : NIPPON DATA2010. / Tsuji, Masayoshi; Arima, Hisatomi; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Nakamura, Koshi; Takezaki, Toshiro; Sakata, Kiyomi; Okuda, Nagako; Nishi, Nobuo; Kadota, Aya; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Okayama, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki.

In: Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 28, 01.01.2018, p. S46-S52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsuji, M, Arima, H, Ohkubo, T, Nakamura, K, Takezaki, T, Sakata, K, Okuda, N, Nishi, N, Kadota, A, Okamura, T, Ueshima, H, Okayama, A & Miura, K 2018, 'Socioeconomic Status and Knowledge of Cardiovascular Risk Factors: NIPPON DATA2010', Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 28, pp. S46-S52. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20170255
Tsuji, Masayoshi ; Arima, Hisatomi ; Ohkubo, Takayoshi ; Nakamura, Koshi ; Takezaki, Toshiro ; Sakata, Kiyomi ; Okuda, Nagako ; Nishi, Nobuo ; Kadota, Aya ; Okamura, Tomonori ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu ; Okayama, Akira ; Miura, Katsuyuki. / Socioeconomic Status and Knowledge of Cardiovascular Risk Factors : NIPPON DATA2010. In: Journal of Epidemiology. 2018 ; Vol. 28. pp. S46-S52.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors remains unknown in a general Japanese population.METHODS: Of 8,815 participants from 300 randomly selected areas throughout Japan, 2,467 participants who were free of cardiovascular disease and who provided information on SES in the National Health and Nutrition Survey of Japan 2010 were enrolled in this cross-sectional analysis. SES was classified according to the employment status, length of education, marital and living statuses, and equivalent household expenditure (EHE). Outcomes were ignorance of each cardiovascular risk factor (hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, low high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, arrhythmia, and smoking) and insufficient knowledge (number of correct answers <4 out of 6).RESULTS: A short education and low EHE were significantly associated with a greater ignorance of most cardiovascular risk factors. A short education (<10 years) was also associated with insufficient knowledge of overall cardiovascular risk factors: age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios (OR) were 1.92 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.51-2.45) relative to participants with ≥13 years of education. Low EHE was also associated with insufficient knowledge (age- and sex-adjusted OR 1.24; 95{\%} CI, 1.01-1.51 for the lowest quintile vs the upper 4 quintiles). These relationships remained significant, even after further adjustments for regular exercise, smoking, weekly alcohol consumption, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and low HDL cholesterol.CONCLUSION: Participants with a short education and low EHE were more likely to have less knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors.",
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AU - Tsuji, Masayoshi

AU - Arima, Hisatomi

AU - Ohkubo, Takayoshi

AU - Nakamura, Koshi

AU - Takezaki, Toshiro

AU - Sakata, Kiyomi

AU - Okuda, Nagako

AU - Nishi, Nobuo

AU - Kadota, Aya

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Ueshima, Hirotsugu

AU - Okayama, Akira

AU - Miura, Katsuyuki

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