SOCS1 and regulation of regulatory T cells plasticity

Reiko Takahashi, Akihiko Yoshimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several reports have suggested that natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) lose Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression and suppression activity under certain inflammatory conditions. Treg plasticity has been studied because it may be associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Some studies showed that a minor uncommitted Foxp3(+) T cell population, which lacks hypomethylation at Treg-specific demethylation regions (TSDRs), may convert to effector/helper T cells. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), a negative regulator of cytokine signaling, has been reported to play an important role in Treg cell integrity and function by protecting the cells from excessive inflammatory cytokines. In this review, we discuss Treg plasticity and maintenance of suppression functions in both physiological and pathological settings. In addition, we discuss molecular mechanisms of maintaining Treg plasticity by SOCS1 and other molecules. Such information will be useful for therapy of autoimmune diseases and reinforcement of antitumor immunity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)943149
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Immunology Research
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Cytokines
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Autoimmunity
Autoimmune Diseases
Immunity
Maintenance
T-Lymphocytes
Cell Plasticity
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

SOCS1 and regulation of regulatory T cells plasticity. / Takahashi, Reiko; Yoshimura, Akihiko.

In: Journal of Immunology Research, Vol. 2014, 2014, p. 943149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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