Solution-processed organic spin-charge converter

Kazuya Ando, Shun Watanabe, Sebastian Mooser, Eiji Saitoh, Henning Sirringhaus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conjugated polymers and small organic molecules are enabling new, flexible, large-area, low-cost optoelectronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes, transistors and solar cells. Owing to their exceptionally long spin lifetimes, these carbon-based materials could also have an important impact on spintronics, where carrier spins play a key role in transmitting, processing and storing information. However, to exploit this potential, a method for direct conversion of spin information into an electric signal is indispensable. Here we show that a pure spin current can be produced in a solution-processed conducting polymer by pumping spins through a ferromagnetic resonance in an adjacent magnetic insulator, and that this generates an electric voltage across the polymer film. We demonstrate that the experimental characteristics of the generated voltage are consistent with it being generated through an inverse spin Hall effect in the conducting polymer. In contrast with inorganic materials, the conducting polymer exhibits coexistence of high spin-current to charge-current conversion efficiency and long spin lifetimes. Our discovery opens a route for a new generation of molecular-structure-engineered spintronic devices, which could lead to important advances in plastic spintronics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)622-627
Number of pages6
JournalNature Materials
Volume12
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jul

Fingerprint

Magnetoelectronics
Conducting polymers
converters
Spin Hall effect
Ferromagnetic resonance
conducting polymers
Conjugated polymers
Organic light emitting diodes (OLED)
Electric potential
Polymer films
Optoelectronic devices
Molecular structure
Conversion efficiency
Solar cells
Transistors
Carbon
Plastics
Molecules
Processing
life (durability)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Ando, K., Watanabe, S., Mooser, S., Saitoh, E., & Sirringhaus, H. (2013). Solution-processed organic spin-charge converter. Nature Materials, 12(7), 622-627. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3634

Solution-processed organic spin-charge converter. / Ando, Kazuya; Watanabe, Shun; Mooser, Sebastian; Saitoh, Eiji; Sirringhaus, Henning.

In: Nature Materials, Vol. 12, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 622-627.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ando, K, Watanabe, S, Mooser, S, Saitoh, E & Sirringhaus, H 2013, 'Solution-processed organic spin-charge converter', Nature Materials, vol. 12, no. 7, pp. 622-627. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3634
Ando K, Watanabe S, Mooser S, Saitoh E, Sirringhaus H. Solution-processed organic spin-charge converter. Nature Materials. 2013 Jul;12(7):622-627. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3634
Ando, Kazuya ; Watanabe, Shun ; Mooser, Sebastian ; Saitoh, Eiji ; Sirringhaus, Henning. / Solution-processed organic spin-charge converter. In: Nature Materials. 2013 ; Vol. 12, No. 7. pp. 622-627.
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