Solving hanabi: Estimating hands by opponent's actions in cooperative game with incomplete information

Hirotaka Osawa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A unique behavior of humans is modifying one's unobservable behavior based on the reaction of others for cooperation. We used a card game called Hanabi as an evaluation task of imitating human reflective intelligence with artificial intelligence. Hanabi is a cooperative card game with incomplete information. A player cooperates with an opponent in building several card sets constructed with the same color and ordered numbers. However, like a blind man's bluff, each player sees the cards of all other players except his/her own. Also, communication between players is restricted to information about the same numbers and colors, and the player is required to read his/his opponent's intention with the opponent's hand, estimate his/her cards with incomplete information, and play one of them for building a set. We compared human play with several simulated strategies. The results indicate that the strategy with feedbacks from simulated opponent's viewpoints achieves more score than other strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComputer Poker and Imperfect Information - Papers Presented at the 29th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Technical Report
PublisherAI Access Foundation
Pages37-43
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781577357186
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event29th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, AAAI 2015 - Austin, United States
Duration: 2015 Jan 252015 Jan 30

Publication series

NameAAAI Workshop - Technical Report
VolumeWS-15-07

Conference

Conference29th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, AAAI 2015
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityAustin
Period15/1/2515/1/30

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Solving hanabi: Estimating hands by opponent's actions in cooperative game with incomplete information'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this