Some ways to prevail public library service in every town and village - Focused on the possibility of the association library

Masaru Itoga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In Japan very high is the proportion of towns and villages not having any public libraries. The association library (kumiai-ritsu toshokan), which is usually founded by several cities, towns and villages, has been considered as an effective measure to serve these small towns and villages. The reasoning upon which the association library is based, however, seems to lack two points of view; the one is how broad area the association library must serve, and the other is how many books it must add to its collection every year. In terms of these physical aspects and, in addition to them, of legal aspects the author examines the possibility of the association library. The findings are as follows: 1) It is likely that the association library has some effects merely on reducing the number of unserved towns and villages. 2) Given the average level of library expenditure per capita in towns and villages, the association library needs to serve a population of at least 160,000-170,000 if it is to provide substantial service. 3) Serving such a population means that it must have a broad service area not less than 750km2. This is too broad to serve with a fixed library facility and a few bookmobiles. 4) Then, library expenditure per capita needs to be raised so that the association library may serve either for less population or with more facilities. An alternative to this is to serve that area with bookmobiles alone. 5) If we choose to raise library expenditure per capita, it will need to be about 900 yen (in 1979). This is high enough for a town or village to provide public libray service by itself. 6) Library service with bookmobiles alone should be a temporary measure. But we must note that what this measure is oriented to is inconsistent with what the legal affairs association (jimu kumiai) per se is oriented to. It is concluded that even the smallest town or village should make efforts to have its own library system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-144
Number of pages16
JournalLibrary and Information Science
Volume1982
Issue number20
Publication statusPublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

village
town
expenditures
small town
public service
Japan
lack

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

Some ways to prevail public library service in every town and village - Focused on the possibility of the association library. / Itoga, Masaru.

In: Library and Information Science, Vol. 1982, No. 20, 1982, p. 129-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ad1e1fabef07464b843030b670f6bd8b,
title = "Some ways to prevail public library service in every town and village - Focused on the possibility of the association library",
abstract = "In Japan very high is the proportion of towns and villages not having any public libraries. The association library (kumiai-ritsu toshokan), which is usually founded by several cities, towns and villages, has been considered as an effective measure to serve these small towns and villages. The reasoning upon which the association library is based, however, seems to lack two points of view; the one is how broad area the association library must serve, and the other is how many books it must add to its collection every year. In terms of these physical aspects and, in addition to them, of legal aspects the author examines the possibility of the association library. The findings are as follows: 1) It is likely that the association library has some effects merely on reducing the number of unserved towns and villages. 2) Given the average level of library expenditure per capita in towns and villages, the association library needs to serve a population of at least 160,000-170,000 if it is to provide substantial service. 3) Serving such a population means that it must have a broad service area not less than 750km2. This is too broad to serve with a fixed library facility and a few bookmobiles. 4) Then, library expenditure per capita needs to be raised so that the association library may serve either for less population or with more facilities. An alternative to this is to serve that area with bookmobiles alone. 5) If we choose to raise library expenditure per capita, it will need to be about 900 yen (in 1979). This is high enough for a town or village to provide public libray service by itself. 6) Library service with bookmobiles alone should be a temporary measure. But we must note that what this measure is oriented to is inconsistent with what the legal affairs association (jimu kumiai) per se is oriented to. It is concluded that even the smallest town or village should make efforts to have its own library system.",
author = "Masaru Itoga",
year = "1982",
language = "English",
volume = "1982",
pages = "129--144",
journal = "Library and Information Science",
issn = "0373-4447",
publisher = "Mita Society for Library and Information Science",
number = "20",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Some ways to prevail public library service in every town and village - Focused on the possibility of the association library

AU - Itoga, Masaru

PY - 1982

Y1 - 1982

N2 - In Japan very high is the proportion of towns and villages not having any public libraries. The association library (kumiai-ritsu toshokan), which is usually founded by several cities, towns and villages, has been considered as an effective measure to serve these small towns and villages. The reasoning upon which the association library is based, however, seems to lack two points of view; the one is how broad area the association library must serve, and the other is how many books it must add to its collection every year. In terms of these physical aspects and, in addition to them, of legal aspects the author examines the possibility of the association library. The findings are as follows: 1) It is likely that the association library has some effects merely on reducing the number of unserved towns and villages. 2) Given the average level of library expenditure per capita in towns and villages, the association library needs to serve a population of at least 160,000-170,000 if it is to provide substantial service. 3) Serving such a population means that it must have a broad service area not less than 750km2. This is too broad to serve with a fixed library facility and a few bookmobiles. 4) Then, library expenditure per capita needs to be raised so that the association library may serve either for less population or with more facilities. An alternative to this is to serve that area with bookmobiles alone. 5) If we choose to raise library expenditure per capita, it will need to be about 900 yen (in 1979). This is high enough for a town or village to provide public libray service by itself. 6) Library service with bookmobiles alone should be a temporary measure. But we must note that what this measure is oriented to is inconsistent with what the legal affairs association (jimu kumiai) per se is oriented to. It is concluded that even the smallest town or village should make efforts to have its own library system.

AB - In Japan very high is the proportion of towns and villages not having any public libraries. The association library (kumiai-ritsu toshokan), which is usually founded by several cities, towns and villages, has been considered as an effective measure to serve these small towns and villages. The reasoning upon which the association library is based, however, seems to lack two points of view; the one is how broad area the association library must serve, and the other is how many books it must add to its collection every year. In terms of these physical aspects and, in addition to them, of legal aspects the author examines the possibility of the association library. The findings are as follows: 1) It is likely that the association library has some effects merely on reducing the number of unserved towns and villages. 2) Given the average level of library expenditure per capita in towns and villages, the association library needs to serve a population of at least 160,000-170,000 if it is to provide substantial service. 3) Serving such a population means that it must have a broad service area not less than 750km2. This is too broad to serve with a fixed library facility and a few bookmobiles. 4) Then, library expenditure per capita needs to be raised so that the association library may serve either for less population or with more facilities. An alternative to this is to serve that area with bookmobiles alone. 5) If we choose to raise library expenditure per capita, it will need to be about 900 yen (in 1979). This is high enough for a town or village to provide public libray service by itself. 6) Library service with bookmobiles alone should be a temporary measure. But we must note that what this measure is oriented to is inconsistent with what the legal affairs association (jimu kumiai) per se is oriented to. It is concluded that even the smallest town or village should make efforts to have its own library system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=55249092152&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=55249092152&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:55249092152

VL - 1982

SP - 129

EP - 144

JO - Library and Information Science

JF - Library and Information Science

SN - 0373-4447

IS - 20

ER -