Species difference in intestinal absorption mechanism of etoposide and digoxin between cynomolgus monkey and rat

Tomohiro Nishimura, Y. Kato, N. Amano, M. Ono, Y. Kubo, Y. Kimura, H. Fujita, A. Tsuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. The oral bioavailability of some therapeutic agents is markedly lower in cynomolgus monkeys than in humans. We investigated small-intestinal absorption of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates etoposide and digoxin in monkeys to clarify the influence of efflux transport on their intestinal permeability. Methods. The pharmacokinetics of etoposide and digoxin was examined in monkeys and rats after oral and intravenous administration. Intestinal permeability and segmental differences in permeability were investigated with an Ussing-type chamber. Results. The bioavailability of etoposide was 12.9 and 13.9% in monkeys and rats, respectively. Total body clearance of etoposide in monkeys was much less than hepatic blood flow, suggesting that the bioavailability would be limited at intestinal absorption. Marked vectorial transport of etoposide in the secretory direction was observed in rats, especially in the lower small intestine, and segmental differences were consistent with the distribution of P-gp expression. Vectorial transport was minimal in monkey small intestine. Our kinetic analysis indicated that P-gp contributes little to the intestinal permeability of etoposide and digoxin in monkeys, and apical uptake is rate-limiting. Conclusion. Low bioavailability of etoposide in monkeys is due to poor intestinal uptake resulting from low influx from the apical side, rather than secretion via P-gp.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2467-2476
Number of pages10
JournalPharmaceutical Research
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Nov
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Macaca fascicularis
Digoxin
Intestinal Absorption
Etoposide
Haplorhini
Rats
P-Glycoprotein
Biological Availability
Permeability
Small Intestine
Pharmacokinetics
Intravenous Administration
Oral Administration
Blood
Kinetics
Liver
Substrates

Keywords

  • Bioavailability
  • Cynomolgus monkey
  • Intestinal absorption
  • P-glycoprotein
  • Species difference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Biotechnology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Species difference in intestinal absorption mechanism of etoposide and digoxin between cynomolgus monkey and rat. / Nishimura, Tomohiro; Kato, Y.; Amano, N.; Ono, M.; Kubo, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Fujita, H.; Tsuji, A.

In: Pharmaceutical Research, Vol. 25, No. 11, 11.2008, p. 2467-2476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nishimura, Tomohiro ; Kato, Y. ; Amano, N. ; Ono, M. ; Kubo, Y. ; Kimura, Y. ; Fujita, H. ; Tsuji, A. / Species difference in intestinal absorption mechanism of etoposide and digoxin between cynomolgus monkey and rat. In: Pharmaceutical Research. 2008 ; Vol. 25, No. 11. pp. 2467-2476.
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