Specific adsorption of a β-lactam antibiotic: In vivo by an anion-exchange resin for protection of the intestinal microbiota

Shunyi Li, Kyosuke Yakabe, Khadijah Zai, Yiwei Liu, Akihiro Kishimura, Koji Hase, Yun Gi Kim, Takeshi Mori, Yoshiki Katayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The fraction of antibiotics that are excreted from the intestine during administration leads to disruption of commensal bacteria as well as resulting in dysbiosis and various diseases. To protect the gut microbiota during treatment with antibiotics, use of activated carbon (AC) has recently been reported as a method to adsorb antibiotics. However, the antibiotic adsorption by AC is nonspecific and may also result in the adsorption of essential biological molecules. In this work, we reported that an anion exchange resin (AER) has better specificity than AC for adsorbing the β-lactam antibiotic cefoperazone (CEF). Because CEF has a negatively charged carboxylate group and a conjugated system, the AER was used to adsorb CEF through electrostatic and π-π interactions. The AER was specific for CEF over biological molecules such as bile acids and vitamins in the intestine. The AER protected Escherichia coli from CEF in vitro. Furthermore, oral administration of the AER reduced the fecal free CEF concentration, and protected the gut microbiota from CEF-induced dysbiosis. This journal is

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7219-7227
Number of pages9
JournalBiomaterials Science
Volume9
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Nov 7

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)

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