Spleen is a primary site for activation of platelet-reactive T and B cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura

Masataka Kuwana, Yuka Okazaki, Junichi Kaburaki, Yutaka Kawakami, Yasuo Ikeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We have recently reported that in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (IMTP), circulating T and B cells that are responsive to gpIIb-IIIa can induce anti-platelet autoantibody production. In this study, the frequencies and activation status of gpIIb-IIIa-reactive T and B cells were evaluated in the peripheral blood and spleen obtained from nine IMTP patients undergoing splenectomy. There was no difference in gpIIb-IIIa-reactive T cell frequencies between peripheral blood and spleen (6.4 ± 2.6 vs 5.2 ± 2.4 per 105 T cells), as determined by limiting dilution analysis, but activated T cells responsive to gpIIb-IIIa showing accelerated proliferation kinetics and those expressing CD154 were more frequent in spleen than in peripheral blood. The frequencies of anti-gpIIb-IIIa Ab-producing B cells, as determined by ELISPOT assay, were also similar in peripheral blood and spleen (61.2 ± 24.0 vs 77.7 ± 45.3 per 105 B cells); however, an anti-gpIIb-IIIa Ab was spontaneously produced by splenocytes in vitro, but scarcely secreted by PBMCs. CD19-/surface Ig-/CD38+/CD138+ plasma cells secreting anti-gpIIb-IIIa Ab were exclusively detected in the spleen. In serial analysis, the frequencies of circulating gpIIb-IIIa-reactive T and B cells were decreased after splenectomy in patients with a complete response, but were unchanged in nonresponders. These findings indicate that an interaction between gpIIb-IIIa-reactive T and B cells inducing anti-platelet Ab production in IMTP patients occurs primarily in the spleen and that the significant number of gpIIb-IIIa-reactive T and B cells activated in the spleen are released into the circulation as memory cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3675-3682
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume168
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Apr 1

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Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura
Platelet Activation
B-Lymphocytes
Spleen
T-Lymphocytes
Splenectomy
Blood Platelets
Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay
Plasma Cells
Autoantibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Kuwana, M., Okazaki, Y., Kaburaki, J., Kawakami, Y., & Ikeda, Y. (2002). Spleen is a primary site for activation of platelet-reactive T and B cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Journal of Immunology, 168(7), 3675-3682.

Spleen is a primary site for activation of platelet-reactive T and B cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura. / Kuwana, Masataka; Okazaki, Yuka; Kaburaki, Junichi; Kawakami, Yutaka; Ikeda, Yasuo.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 168, No. 7, 01.04.2002, p. 3675-3682.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kuwana, M, Okazaki, Y, Kaburaki, J, Kawakami, Y & Ikeda, Y 2002, 'Spleen is a primary site for activation of platelet-reactive T and B cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura', Journal of Immunology, vol. 168, no. 7, pp. 3675-3682.
Kuwana, Masataka ; Okazaki, Yuka ; Kaburaki, Junichi ; Kawakami, Yutaka ; Ikeda, Yasuo. / Spleen is a primary site for activation of platelet-reactive T and B cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura. In: Journal of Immunology. 2002 ; Vol. 168, No. 7. pp. 3675-3682.
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