Stability of benzylpenicillin potassium and ampicillin in an elastomeric infusion pump

Tomomi Nakamura, Yuki Enoki, Shunsuke Uno, Yoshifumi Uwamino, Osamu Iketani, Naoki Hasegawa, Kazuaki Matsumoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Some infectious diseases, such as infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and abscesses, require treatment with long-term intravenous antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, the patient is required to stay in the hospital to receive therapy, which lowers their quality of life. Establishing an outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) by continuous infusion pump is desired in Japan to overcome these issues. However, the 24-h stability of antimicrobial agents dissolved in infusion solutions is unclear. Thus, we investigated the stability of antimicrobial agents in five different infusion solutions in a clinical setting. Benzylpenicillin potassium (PCG) and ampicillin (ABPC) were dissolved separately in five different infusion solutions and kept at 25 or 31.1 °C for 24 h. The residual ratios were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Dissolved PCG in acetate ringer solution remained stable for 24 h at temperatures of 25 and 31.1 °C (101.7 ± 1.4% and 92.9 ± 1.3%, respectively). In addition, the PCG solution did not adsorb onto the elastomeric infusion pump after 24 h at 31.1 °C. PCG dissolved in acetate ringer solution was also stable for 10 days after being kept in an elastomeric infusion pump at 4 °C (99.7 ± 0.5%). ABPC was unstable in all of the tested infusion solutions and temperatures. Based on our results, PCG in acetate ringer solution can be used in OPAT with continuous infusion pumps.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Infection and Chemotherapy
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Infusion Pumps
Penicillin G
Ampicillin
Acetates
Anti-Infective Agents
Outpatients
Therapeutics
Temperature
Osteomyelitis
Endocarditis
Abscess
Communicable Diseases
Length of Stay
Japan
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Quality of Life
elastomeric
Ringer's solution

Keywords

  • Acetate ringer solution
  • Ampicillin
  • Benzylpenicillin potassium
  • Elastomeric infusion pump
  • Infective endocarditis
  • Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Stability of benzylpenicillin potassium and ampicillin in an elastomeric infusion pump",
abstract = "Some infectious diseases, such as infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and abscesses, require treatment with long-term intravenous antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, the patient is required to stay in the hospital to receive therapy, which lowers their quality of life. Establishing an outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) by continuous infusion pump is desired in Japan to overcome these issues. However, the 24-h stability of antimicrobial agents dissolved in infusion solutions is unclear. Thus, we investigated the stability of antimicrobial agents in five different infusion solutions in a clinical setting. Benzylpenicillin potassium (PCG) and ampicillin (ABPC) were dissolved separately in five different infusion solutions and kept at 25 or 31.1 °C for 24 h. The residual ratios were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Dissolved PCG in acetate ringer solution remained stable for 24 h at temperatures of 25 and 31.1 °C (101.7 ± 1.4{\%} and 92.9 ± 1.3{\%}, respectively). In addition, the PCG solution did not adsorb onto the elastomeric infusion pump after 24 h at 31.1 °C. PCG dissolved in acetate ringer solution was also stable for 10 days after being kept in an elastomeric infusion pump at 4 °C (99.7 ± 0.5{\%}). ABPC was unstable in all of the tested infusion solutions and temperatures. Based on our results, PCG in acetate ringer solution can be used in OPAT with continuous infusion pumps.",
keywords = "Acetate ringer solution, Ampicillin, Benzylpenicillin potassium, Elastomeric infusion pump, Infective endocarditis, Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy",
author = "Tomomi Nakamura and Yuki Enoki and Shunsuke Uno and Yoshifumi Uwamino and Osamu Iketani and Naoki Hasegawa and Kazuaki Matsumoto",
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T1 - Stability of benzylpenicillin potassium and ampicillin in an elastomeric infusion pump

AU - Nakamura, Tomomi

AU - Enoki, Yuki

AU - Uno, Shunsuke

AU - Uwamino, Yoshifumi

AU - Iketani, Osamu

AU - Hasegawa, Naoki

AU - Matsumoto, Kazuaki

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Some infectious diseases, such as infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and abscesses, require treatment with long-term intravenous antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, the patient is required to stay in the hospital to receive therapy, which lowers their quality of life. Establishing an outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) by continuous infusion pump is desired in Japan to overcome these issues. However, the 24-h stability of antimicrobial agents dissolved in infusion solutions is unclear. Thus, we investigated the stability of antimicrobial agents in five different infusion solutions in a clinical setting. Benzylpenicillin potassium (PCG) and ampicillin (ABPC) were dissolved separately in five different infusion solutions and kept at 25 or 31.1 °C for 24 h. The residual ratios were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Dissolved PCG in acetate ringer solution remained stable for 24 h at temperatures of 25 and 31.1 °C (101.7 ± 1.4% and 92.9 ± 1.3%, respectively). In addition, the PCG solution did not adsorb onto the elastomeric infusion pump after 24 h at 31.1 °C. PCG dissolved in acetate ringer solution was also stable for 10 days after being kept in an elastomeric infusion pump at 4 °C (99.7 ± 0.5%). ABPC was unstable in all of the tested infusion solutions and temperatures. Based on our results, PCG in acetate ringer solution can be used in OPAT with continuous infusion pumps.

AB - Some infectious diseases, such as infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and abscesses, require treatment with long-term intravenous antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, the patient is required to stay in the hospital to receive therapy, which lowers their quality of life. Establishing an outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) by continuous infusion pump is desired in Japan to overcome these issues. However, the 24-h stability of antimicrobial agents dissolved in infusion solutions is unclear. Thus, we investigated the stability of antimicrobial agents in five different infusion solutions in a clinical setting. Benzylpenicillin potassium (PCG) and ampicillin (ABPC) were dissolved separately in five different infusion solutions and kept at 25 or 31.1 °C for 24 h. The residual ratios were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Dissolved PCG in acetate ringer solution remained stable for 24 h at temperatures of 25 and 31.1 °C (101.7 ± 1.4% and 92.9 ± 1.3%, respectively). In addition, the PCG solution did not adsorb onto the elastomeric infusion pump after 24 h at 31.1 °C. PCG dissolved in acetate ringer solution was also stable for 10 days after being kept in an elastomeric infusion pump at 4 °C (99.7 ± 0.5%). ABPC was unstable in all of the tested infusion solutions and temperatures. Based on our results, PCG in acetate ringer solution can be used in OPAT with continuous infusion pumps.

KW - Acetate ringer solution

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KW - Benzylpenicillin potassium

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KW - Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy

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