Steps toward safe cell therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells

Hideyuki Okano, Masaya Nakamura, Kenji Yoshida, Yohei Okada, Osahiko Tsuji, Satoshi Nori, Eiji Ikeda, Shinya Yamanaka, Kyoko Miura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

228 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The enthusiasm for producing patient-specific human embryonic stem cells using somatic nuclear transfer has somewhat abated in recent years because of ethical, technical, and political concerns. However, the interest in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), in which pluripotency can be obtained by transcription factor transduction of various somatic cells, has rapidly increased. Human iPSCs are anticipated to open enormous opportunities in the biomedical sciences in terms of cell therapies for regenerative medicine and stem cell modeling of human disease. On the other hand, recent reports have emphasized the pitfalls of iPSC technology, including the potential for genetic and epigenetic abnormalities, tumorigenicity, and immunogenicity of transplanted cells. These constitute serious safety-related concerns for iPSC-based cell therapy. However, preclinical data supporting the safety and efficacy of iPSCs are also accumulating. In this Review, recent achievements and future tasks for safe iPSC-based cell therapy are summarized, using regenerative medicine for repair strategies in the damaged central nervous system (CNS) as a model. Insights on safety and preclinical use of iPSCs in cardiovascular repair model are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)523-533
Number of pages11
JournalCirculation Research
Volume112
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb 1

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Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Regenerative Medicine
Safety
Cardiovascular Models
Epigenomics
Transcription Factors
Stem Cells
Central Nervous System
Technology

Keywords

  • induced pluripotent stem cell
  • neural stem/progenitor cell
  • spinal cord injury
  • transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Steps toward safe cell therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells. / Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya; Yoshida, Kenji; Okada, Yohei; Tsuji, Osahiko; Nori, Satoshi; Ikeda, Eiji; Yamanaka, Shinya; Miura, Kyoko.

In: Circulation Research, Vol. 112, No. 3, 01.02.2013, p. 523-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Okano, H, Nakamura, M, Yoshida, K, Okada, Y, Tsuji, O, Nori, S, Ikeda, E, Yamanaka, S & Miura, K 2013, 'Steps toward safe cell therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells', Circulation Research, vol. 112, no. 3, pp. 523-533. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.111.256149
Okano, Hideyuki ; Nakamura, Masaya ; Yoshida, Kenji ; Okada, Yohei ; Tsuji, Osahiko ; Nori, Satoshi ; Ikeda, Eiji ; Yamanaka, Shinya ; Miura, Kyoko. / Steps toward safe cell therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells. In: Circulation Research. 2013 ; Vol. 112, No. 3. pp. 523-533.
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