Structural organization and chromosomal assignment of the human prostacyclin receptor gene

Yoshihiro Ogawa, Issei Tanaka, Miho Inoue, Yuka Yoshitake, Naohi Isse, Osamu Nakagawa, Takeshi Usui, Hiroshi Itoh, Takaaki Yoshimasa, Shuh Narumiya, Kazuwa Nakao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prostacyclin receptor is a member of the prostanoid receptor family in the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily with seven transmembrane domains. We report here the isolation and structural organization of the human prostacyclin receptor gene. Southern blot analysis demonstrated a single copy of the human prostacyclin receptor gene in the human genome. The human prostacyclin receptor gene spanned approximately 7.0 kb and was composed of three exons separated by two introns. The first intron occurred in the 5′-untranslated region, 13 bp upstream to the ATG start codon. The second intron was located at the end of the sixth transmembrane domain, thereby separating it from the downstream coding region and the 3′-untranslated region. By primer extension analysis, the transcription initiation sites were mapped 870-872 bp upstream to the ATG start codon. The 1.2-kb human prostacyclin receptor 5′-flanking region lacked conventional TATA and CCAAT boxes, but it contained several cis -acting regulatory elements including an inverted CCAAT box (Y box) and two copies of SP-1 binding sites. Using human-rodent somatic hybrid cell DNA, the human prostacyclin receptor gene was assigned to human chromosome 19. The present study helps establish the genetic basis for prostacyclin receptor research and provides further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the prostanoid receptor family.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)142-148
Number of pages7
JournalGenomics
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995 May 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

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    Ogawa, Y., Tanaka, I., Inoue, M., Yoshitake, Y., Isse, N., Nakagawa, O., Usui, T., Itoh, H., Yoshimasa, T., Narumiya, S., & Nakao, K. (1995). Structural organization and chromosomal assignment of the human prostacyclin receptor gene. Genomics, 27(1), 142-148. https://doi.org/10.1006/geno.1995.1016