Success rate and challenges of fetal anesthesia for ultrasound guided fetal intervention by maternal opioid and benzodiazepine administration

Yuki Ohashi, Katsuo Terui, Kazumi Tamura, Motoshi Tanaka, Kazunori Baba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The safe and effective methods of fetal anesthesia/analgesia during ultrasound guided direct fetal procedure are yet to be determined. The authors investigated whether maternal diazepam/fentanyl administration meets this purpose. Methods: The medical/anesthesia records were retrospectively reviewed in cases between 2001 and 2010 at a tertiary perinatal center. Success rate as well as maternal and fetal complications were analysed. Results: Among the 150 procedures in 118 fetuses, diazepam 10 mg and fentanyl 200 μg sufficiently prevented fetal movement upon the procedure in 56% of the procedures. Supplemental anesthetic agents such as nitrous oxide and propofol were needed in other cases. No serious maternal complication was noted, while fetal cardiac arrest/severe bradycardia was noted in three fetuses, one of which was successfully resuscitated by intracardiac adrenalin injection. Conclusions: Maternal diiazepam/fentanyl administration offered adequate fetal condition without significant maternal complications. Since these procedures are performed to treat severe fetal conditions, preparation for fetal resuscitation is also important.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-160
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cordocentesis
  • Diazepam
  • Fentanyl
  • Fetal anesthesia
  • Fetal cardiac arrest
  • Thoracoamniotic shunt

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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