Surgeon perceptions of the complications and value of threaded fusion cages as a spine fusion technique

Results of a consensus survey

Allen L. Carl, John Kostuik, Cameron B. Huckell, Jean Jacques Abitbol, Morio Matsumoto, Ann Sieber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background context: Threaded cage technology has had a meteoric rise in usage. It has been touted as a procedure with low risk and minimal complications. PURPOSE: To gauge the spine surgical community's general consensus regarding cage usage and its complications. Study design/setting: A canvassing questionnaire regarding threaded cage usage and complications was sent to members of the North American Spine Society. Patient sample: A total of 665 doctors reported on their perception of 22,585 cages placed by the second year after pre-market approval from the Food and Drug Administration approval. Outcome measures: A nonscientific canvassing questionnaire was thought to give a consensus of surgical outcome perception in a large number of caregivers with hopes of understanding general trends. Methods: Simple statistical measurements were used to report perceived complications by surgeons involved in performing threaded cage surgical procedures. Results: Sixty-nine percent of doctors reported at least one complication with threaded cages, but the complication incidence was low. Visceral injuries were reported in 0.1%; vascular injuries, 1.0%; cage displacement and dislodgement, 1.4%; temporary and permanent neurologic injuries, 2.25% and 0.56%, respectively; infection 0.34%; retrograde ejaculation 1.2% and revision surgery recorded for 2.7%. Those rating cages as fair to poor (16.5%) were those physicians reporting the longest experience with this technology. Conclusions: The general consensus is that threaded cages have low complication rates and high satisfaction rates, 83.5%. The data represent a convenience sampling and is not scientific.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-359
Number of pages4
JournalSpine Journal
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Sep

Fingerprint

Consensus
Spine
Hope
Technology
Nervous System Trauma
Drug Approval
Ejaculation
Vascular System Injuries
United States Food and Drug Administration
Reoperation
Caregivers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Infection
Surgeons
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cage technology consensus
  • Interbody fusion technology
  • Surgeon perception of cage fusion
  • Threaded cage complications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Surgeon perceptions of the complications and value of threaded fusion cages as a spine fusion technique : Results of a consensus survey. / Carl, Allen L.; Kostuik, John; Huckell, Cameron B.; Abitbol, Jean Jacques; Matsumoto, Morio; Sieber, Ann.

In: Spine Journal, Vol. 3, No. 5, 09.2003, p. 356-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carl, Allen L. ; Kostuik, John ; Huckell, Cameron B. ; Abitbol, Jean Jacques ; Matsumoto, Morio ; Sieber, Ann. / Surgeon perceptions of the complications and value of threaded fusion cages as a spine fusion technique : Results of a consensus survey. In: Spine Journal. 2003 ; Vol. 3, No. 5. pp. 356-359.
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abstract = "Background context: Threaded cage technology has had a meteoric rise in usage. It has been touted as a procedure with low risk and minimal complications. PURPOSE: To gauge the spine surgical community's general consensus regarding cage usage and its complications. Study design/setting: A canvassing questionnaire regarding threaded cage usage and complications was sent to members of the North American Spine Society. Patient sample: A total of 665 doctors reported on their perception of 22,585 cages placed by the second year after pre-market approval from the Food and Drug Administration approval. Outcome measures: A nonscientific canvassing questionnaire was thought to give a consensus of surgical outcome perception in a large number of caregivers with hopes of understanding general trends. Methods: Simple statistical measurements were used to report perceived complications by surgeons involved in performing threaded cage surgical procedures. Results: Sixty-nine percent of doctors reported at least one complication with threaded cages, but the complication incidence was low. Visceral injuries were reported in 0.1{\%}; vascular injuries, 1.0{\%}; cage displacement and dislodgement, 1.4{\%}; temporary and permanent neurologic injuries, 2.25{\%} and 0.56{\%}, respectively; infection 0.34{\%}; retrograde ejaculation 1.2{\%} and revision surgery recorded for 2.7{\%}. Those rating cages as fair to poor (16.5{\%}) were those physicians reporting the longest experience with this technology. Conclusions: The general consensus is that threaded cages have low complication rates and high satisfaction rates, 83.5{\%}. The data represent a convenience sampling and is not scientific.",
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