Surgical site infection risk factors identified by multivariate analysis for patient undergoing laparoscopic, open colon, and gastric surgery

Eiko Imai, Masakazu Ueda, Kent Kanao, Tetsuro Kubota, Hirotoshi Hasegawa, Kazuyuki Omae, Masaki Kitajima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important clinical indicator of quality of patient care and infection control; therefore, we aimed to assess risk factors SSI in colon and gastric surgeries. Methods: SSI was assessed according to the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) system (1999). Risk factors examined included operative approach, operative procedure, duration of operation, diabetes mellitus (DM), body mass index (BMI), age, and sex. Results: Among 3152 operated patients, 1675 patients were included in the study. The univariate analysis showed that male sex, high BMI, and long duration of operation were significant risk factors for colon surgery and that advanced age, presence of DM and long duration of operation were significant risk factors for gastric surgery. The multivariate analysis indicated that significant risk factors for SSI were BMI of 25 or above, open surgery, and long duration of operation for colon surgery and open surgery for gastric surgery. The SSI rate of laparoscopic colon surgery was 40%, less than that of open colon surgery, and that of laparoscopic gastric surgery was 75%, less than that of open gastric surgery. Conclusion: The risk factors for SSI depend on whether the operation is laparoscopic or open and duration of operation. In addition, BMI (25 or above) and age (70 years or above) are risk factors for colon and gastric surgery, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)727-731
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume36
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Dec

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Surgical Wound Infection
Stomach
Colon
Multivariate Analysis
Body Mass Index
Laparoscopy
Diabetes Mellitus
Quality of Health Care
Operative Surgical Procedures
Infection Control
Cross Infection
Patient Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Surgical site infection risk factors identified by multivariate analysis for patient undergoing laparoscopic, open colon, and gastric surgery. / Imai, Eiko; Ueda, Masakazu; Kanao, Kent; Kubota, Tetsuro; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Omae, Kazuyuki; Kitajima, Masaki.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 36, No. 10, 12.2008, p. 727-731.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Imai, Eiko ; Ueda, Masakazu ; Kanao, Kent ; Kubota, Tetsuro ; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi ; Omae, Kazuyuki ; Kitajima, Masaki. / Surgical site infection risk factors identified by multivariate analysis for patient undergoing laparoscopic, open colon, and gastric surgery. In: American Journal of Infection Control. 2008 ; Vol. 36, No. 10. pp. 727-731.
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