Surgical treatment for medically refractory myasthenic blepharoptosis

Yusuke Shimizu, Shigeaki Suzuki, Tomohisa Nagasao, Hisao Ogata, Masaki Yazawa, Norihiro Suzuki, Kazuo Kishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients and methods: Eight patients who failed to respond to at least 2 years of medical treatment and who underwent blepharoptosis surgery, from January 2008 to December 2011, were enrolled in this study. Medical records, photographs, and questionnaire results regarding postoperative status were evaluated. Of the eleven procedures performed, four involved frontal suspension, four involved external levator advancement, one involved nonincisional transconjunctival levator advancement, and two involved subbrow blepharoplasty with orbicularis oculi muscle tucking. The margin reflex distance improved postoperatively in seven patients.

Purpose: Currently, only a few reports have recommended surgery as a suitable treatment for blepharoptosis associated with myasthenia gravis. The present study aims to introduce our surgical criteria, surgical options, outcomes, and precautions for medically refractory myasthenic blepharoptosis.

Results: Seven patients had very minimal scarring, and one had minimal scarring. Five patients showed no eyelid asymmetry, one had subtle asymmetry, and two had obvious asymmetry. Seven patients were very satisfied, and one patient was satisfied with the overall result. Postoperative complications included mild lid lag with incomplete eyelid closure, prolonged scar redness, and worsened heterophoria. No patient experienced postoperative exposure keratitis or recurrent blepharoptosis during the study period.

Conclusion: Our results indicate that blepharoptosis surgery is effective for patients with myasthenia gravis, especially those with residual blepharoptosis despite multiple sessions of medical treatments. We recommend that neurologists and surgeons collaborate more systematically and discuss comprehensive treatment plans to increase the quality of life for patients with myasthenia gravis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1859-1867
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Ophthalmology
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Sep 19

Fingerprint

Blepharoptosis
Muscle Weakness
Myasthenia Gravis
Cicatrix
Therapeutics
Eyelids
Blepharoplasty
Keratitis
Medical Records
Reflex
Suspensions
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • Blepharoplasty
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Ocular myasthenia
  • Ptosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Surgical treatment for medically refractory myasthenic blepharoptosis. / Shimizu, Yusuke; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Ogata, Hisao; Yazawa, Masaki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kishi, Kazuo.

In: Clinical Ophthalmology, Vol. 8, 19.09.2014, p. 1859-1867.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shimizu, Yusuke ; Suzuki, Shigeaki ; Nagasao, Tomohisa ; Ogata, Hisao ; Yazawa, Masaki ; Suzuki, Norihiro ; Kishi, Kazuo. / Surgical treatment for medically refractory myasthenic blepharoptosis. In: Clinical Ophthalmology. 2014 ; Vol. 8. pp. 1859-1867.
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