TAKASAGO-6 apparatus for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological non-crystalline particles using X-ray free electron laser at SACLA

Amane Kobayashi, Yuki Sekiguchi, Yuki Takayama, Tomotaka Oroguchi, Keiya Shirahama, Yasufumi Torizuka, Masahiro Manoda, Masayoshi Nakasako, Masaki Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a technique for structure analyses of non-crystalline particles with dimensions ranging from micrometer to sub-micrometer. We have developed a diffraction apparatus named TAKASAGO-6 for use in single-shot CXDI experiments of frozen-hydrated non-crystalline biological particles at cryogenic temperature with X-ray free electron laser pulses provided at a repetition rate of 30 Hz from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser. Specimen particles are flash-cooled after being dispersed on thin membranes supported by specially designed disks. The apparatus is equipped with a high-speed translation stage with a cryogenic pot for raster-scanning of the disks at a speed higher than 25 μm/33 ms. In addition, we use devices assisting the easy transfer of cooled specimens from liquid-nitrogen storages to the cryogenic pot. In the current experimental procedure, more than 20 000 diffraction patterns can be collected within 1 h. Here we report the key components and performance of the diffraction apparatus. Based on the efficiency of the diffraction data collection and the structure analyses of metal particles, biological cells, and cellular organelles, we discuss the future application of this diffraction apparatus for structure analyses of biological specimens.

Original languageEnglish
Article number053109
JournalReview of Scientific Instruments
Volume87
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 May 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation

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