Takete and Maluma in action: A cross-modal relationship between gestures and sounds

Kazuko Shinohara, Naoto Yamauchi, Shigeto Kawahara, Hideyuki Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite Saussure's famous observation that sound-meaning relationships are in principle arbitrary, we now have a substantial body of evidence that sounds themselves can have meanings, patterns often referred to as "sound symbolism". Previous studies have found that particular sounds can be associated with particular meanings, and also with particular static visual shapes. Less well studied is the association between sounds and dynamic movements. Using a free elicitation method, the current experiment shows that several sound symbolic associations between sounds and dynamic movements exist: (1) front vowels are more likely to be associated with small movements than with large movements; (2) front vowels are more likely to be associated with angular movements than with round movements; (3) obstruents are more likely to be associated with angular movements than with round movements; (4) voiced obstruents are more likely to be associated with large movements than with small movements. All of these results are compatible with the results of the previous studies of sound symbolism using static images or meanings. Overall, the current study supports the hypothesis that particular dynamic motions can be associated with particular sounds. Building on the current results, we discuss a possible practical application of these sound symbolic associations in sports instructions.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0163525
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 1

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Gestures
Acoustic waves
Sports
sports
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Takete and Maluma in action : A cross-modal relationship between gestures and sounds. / Shinohara, Kazuko; Yamauchi, Naoto; Kawahara, Shigeto; Tanaka, Hideyuki.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 9, e0163525, 01.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shinohara, Kazuko ; Yamauchi, Naoto ; Kawahara, Shigeto ; Tanaka, Hideyuki. / Takete and Maluma in action : A cross-modal relationship between gestures and sounds. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 9.
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